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Emulation of Super 8 on a digital slr


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#1 Christopher Guerrero

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Posted 03 August 2005 - 11:45 PM

Anyone have a good idea how I could be able to emulate certain Super 8 conditions on my Olympus E-300 Digital SLR. I have a Canon 814xl-s no external meter yet. But I think the shutter speed at 220 degrees comes out at about 1/40th of a second. And the stock is about 40iso for kodachrome I suppose. How would I be able to punch those certain specs into a SLR for gaining exposures before I shoot with film. Any tips or ideas on this would be a great help. Thanks
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#2 Filip Plesha

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Posted 04 August 2005 - 07:04 PM

I don't know much about your specific camera, but Kodachrome might have less latitude than a digital SLR, so be carefull
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#3 Christopher Guerrero

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Posted 04 August 2005 - 07:06 PM

thanks, much more latitude contrast wise? Im just want to be able to take photos of the accurate exposure I want. So I can be able to get an idea how my shot would look on Super 8
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#4 Filip Plesha

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Posted 04 August 2005 - 08:02 PM

Well, to asnwer that I'd have to have some experience with your DSLR, but I have no Idea of its image characteristics. All I'm saying is that a good DSLR (like current Canon and Nikon) will have some more latitude than Kodachrome. Not as much as negative film of course, but closer to it than Kodachrome.

and as for your original question, I think you have answered it already yourself.

In most SLR/DSLR cameras, I think the closest match is 1/45 exposure, so use that exposure lenght, and then change the ISO to 40 or 50 if you don't have the ability to set to 40, but then keep in mind this slight 10 ISO difference when shooting Kodachrome.

This all goes if your DSLR lets you change ISO rating of the sensor. If not, you'll just have to find out the fixed ISO of your sensor and then calculate the difference in your head.

Even if you set everything right, there will probably be differences between these two images even if you match the exposure. It is hard enough as it is emulating Kodachrome with other reversal film. Kodachrome is always slightly denser (darker) than your usual reversal film at the same exposure, but that is not a mis-exposure, its just the part of the whole Kodachrome look: contrasty and strong blacks.


One more thing, if you try to edit the digital images by increasing the contrast, know that it's not as easy as that. Kodachrome has a different way of "contrasting", than your usual photoshop contrast boost.
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