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How many amp hours for my camera?


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#1 Brian Rose

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Posted 04 August 2005 - 03:27 PM

I'm looking at a 12v batter that yields 7 amp hours. Is this adequate for running the motor of a 16mm camera (I have an Eclair). Should I go higher?
Best,
BR
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#2 John Mastrogiacomo

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 03:19 AM

I'm looking at a 12v batter that yields 7 amp hours.  Is this adequate for running the motor of a 16mm camera (I have an Eclair).  Should I go higher?
Best,
BR

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

7 amp hours is more than enough. I have 1.2 amp hour batteries for my ACL and they run at least 3 - 4 400' mags. :)
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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 04:29 AM

Hi,

I guess it would depend how well maintained and lubricated the mechanism was!

Phil
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#4 Nathan Milford

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 08:13 AM

Lets imagine that your camera's nominal current draw is 500 milliamps, half an amp at 12 volts. With a 12v7ah battery, in theory, you can pull one amp for seven hours so. On paper your camera should be able to run for 14 hours or so.

In the real world, environmental conditions effect the battery and a camera's efficiency, but 7ah is a high capacity battery for your purposes, so sipping half an amp from it for a long time is much healthier for the cell than pulling a large load all at once.
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#5 Brian Rose

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 09:27 AM

Hi,

I guess it would depend how well maintained and lubricated the mechanism was!

Phil

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Hey Phil,
You made a very good point about lubrication and maintanance. The camera when I received it is in excellent working order, but your message got me thinking, and perhaps you can help me with this: how do I go about lubricating my camera? That is, I realize some things are best left to the professional, but are there some basic things I can do to maintain the longevity of my camera, and keep it out of the repair shop, and money in my wallet? I would greatly appreciate any help!
Best,
BR
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#6 Nathan Milford

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 09:56 AM

The best way to keep money in your wallet is to send it to a professional for regular service. Or, get training and become a professional yourself.

Regular maintenance keeps the camera running properly over the long run so it can continue making you money. Lack of regular maintenance leads to worse problems. Premature wear and tear on bearings and surfaces and in gear teeth.

A motion picture camera is not like an automobile where you just make sure your fluid levels are ok and forget about it untill you're stuck on the side of the highway waiting for a tow truck. Tiny bascules, pins, capstans, gears, bushings, cams, crankshafts all working together in tolerances of a few microns. Wearmarks that manifest themselves as tiny pock marks on surfaces will raise current as well as the camera's sound level. Crankshafts develop play in thier bearings, and your camera develops a registration problem.

Send your camera in yearly for a checkup... for an Eclair it should only cost about 100 bucks. Have it lubricated every few years. Eclair maintenance is not so costly, only a few hundred bucks here and there. The total cost of ownership of a motion picture camera doesn't stop with the 'Buy It Now' price. If you can't afford to maintain your camera, you can't afford your camera.
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