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Lawrence of Arabia in 70mm


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#1 Michael Struthers

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Posted 04 August 2005 - 05:13 PM

Just saw it at the Castro in 70mm, complete with Overture. The first half of that movie (before the intermission) is as good a movie as has ever been helmed. It's titantic. Last reel gets bogged in politics and unsure motiviations (just like his real life, I guess...)

The 70mm was great, almost 3dlike when in the British Hq at Cairo. Amazing detail in the desert canyons. The screen was the same size as when 35mm is projected. Just seemed to have more detail.

Okay, I know you guys have seen it, but it's not often that you see it in 70mm. I just love that movie.

cheers

Michael Struthers
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#2 Tim Tyler

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Posted 04 August 2005 - 05:37 PM

I went down to L.A. a few years ago to see a new 70mm print that was struck for the 50th Anniversary of the film. It was screened at the Arclight. Most of it looked great, but a lot of the darker scenes, like the desert tent scene with Feisal and Lawrence seemed to have poor blacks and low contrast. I wondered if the print had been timed with telecine in mind.

Prior to that I saw it at the newly re-opened Cinerama in Seattle in the late 90's. It looked fantastic there.
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#3 Steven Budden

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 01:06 AM

Yeah that 70mm film fest at the castro has some interesting choices. Road Warrior, Edward Scissorhands, Space Odyssey... Ghost Busters?

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#4 timHealy

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 02:09 AM

If this was the same restored 70mm print made in the early 90's, (or was it 89??) I thought it was spectacular. I was able to see it at the Zeigfeld in NYC. The only way to see a film and one of the few times I have been able to compare a video version to a projected film while it was fresh in my mind. The next day I rented the film on VHS (it was the early 90's. Not much DVDs out at the time if they were at all) and was completely shocked how much the impact of the film was not there at all. It was as if it wasn't the same movie.

NYC could use a 70mm film festival.

cheers

Tim
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#5 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 05:35 AM

More on the "Splendor of 70mm":

http://www.in70mm.com/

http://www.in70mm.co...owing/index.htm

http://www.in70mm.co...etter/index.htm

http://www.kodak.com...ytlak/70mm1.pdf

http://www.kodak.com...ytlak/70mm2.pdf
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#6 Nate Downes

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Posted 05 August 2005 - 07:11 AM

Anyone know where the 70mm print will be shown? I want to see if it will end up anywhere near me.

I still dream of shooting my epic in 70mm, and would love the inspiration.
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#7 Christian Appelt

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 03:59 PM

Michael,

now just imagine that the film did look even better than what you experienced in that 70mm show! I don't mean to do any nitpicking on the restored version, but when they preserved the film some 15 years ago, the dupe stocks were not as good as today.

Those new 70mm prints sure looked great, but there was no way to preserve the mostly grainless, razor-sharp look of the original 70mm release prints (struck from the OCN which is not the best way to keep it intact). IIRC, almost 220 release prints were produced from OCN using Technicolor's "auto-select" printing:

In the early sixties, Technicolor devised a different method for first generation opticals known as 'auto select' printing. Rather than A & B roll the camera negative for two passes through the printer, the entire shot was included on the cut camera negative sometimes up through the slate or flash frame.
When a dissolve was needed, the printer was rigged to fade out the first shot on the roll, they automatically rewind and fade in the next shot of the same roll for the dissolve. The same applied to other effects like fades.


(quoted from click here: Cinema Treasures )

Edited by Christian Appelt, 06 August 2005 - 04:01 PM.

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#8 Adam L

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Posted 11 August 2005 - 06:36 PM

Showing at the AFI in Silver Spring, MD, Sundays this summer.
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#9 Saul Pincus

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Posted 14 August 2005 - 03:07 PM

now just imagine that the film did look even better than what you experienced in that 70mm show!  I don't mean to do any nitpicking on the restored version, but when they preserved the film some 15 years ago, the dupe stocks were not as good as today.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

It's true duping stocks have improved since then, but even within the restoration there are many prime examples of how damn good the original OCN looks. I'm talking specifically about the restored footage, which of course didn't go through the 1960s duping process before being cut back into the film for the 1989 restoration. Every time a restored section shows up, it looks much sharper and of more "normal" contrast than the original cut around it.

Saul

Edited by Saul Pincus, 14 August 2005 - 03:08 PM.

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#10 Michel Hafner

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 05:03 PM

It's true duping stocks have improved since then, but even within the restoration there are many prime examples of how damn good the original OCN looks.  I'm talking specifically about the restored footage, which of course didn't go through the 1960s duping process before being cut back into the film for the 1989 restoration.  Every time a restored section shows up, it looks much sharper and of more "normal" contrast than the original cut around it.

Saul

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


What 1960 duping process? The film was restored from the original negative, the restored parts and the rest. Some parts had to use other elements since the OCN was unusable/lost.
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