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Agfa Moviechrome 40


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#1 Chris Alex

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 12:42 PM

Does anybody have any experience with this emulsion?

I just got 2 of them on ebay.
Does anybody know a lab to proccess them in Europe?

All the agfa moviechrome i can find is out of date. Does anyone know how it will look like in the end?

Thank you.
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#2 Christian Appelt

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 03:50 PM

Check Andec Filmtechnik at Berlin:

Andec Film Home (english)

Agfa Moviechrome is rather grainy compared to Kodachrome, and it has been discontinued long time ago. So expect to have a loss in contrast and speed. When I shot a lot of Super 8, I used the Agfa stock only when I was out of money. Don't expect it to intercut it with Kodachrome or Fujichrome type of film.

But to be fair, many people preferred the softer, more pastel color rendition of Agfa reversal. But I doubt that this very old stock is worth the extra processing and shipping trouble, better to keep the nice boxes as collectibles. Today, I am sorry that I didn't keep one of the original 1970s Agfachrome (pre-Moviechrome) boxes, they had a really funky design! :) )
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#3 A.Oliver

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Posted 06 August 2005 - 04:30 PM

all my moviechrome 40 and 160 footage from the early 80s have emulsion fungus, k40 from the same era is perfect. A friends collection of films from the mid 80s that were originated on agfa and dixons film stocks have gone the same way. Be very carefull not to record something that cannot easily be re-shot on your moviechrome stock. I would put the cost of processing towards glorious kodachrome instead and bin the moviechrome 40. Andy
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#4 Chris Alex

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Posted 07 August 2005 - 07:27 AM

Thank you very much.
I already had Andec in mind for proccessing.
But i am just wondering if expired agfa film has any weird look.
I sure wont use it on stuff that cant be easilly reshot.
I mainly want to shoot close-ups of old pictures and sketches from early 1900's with my Bealieu 4008 with a slight movement to make the picture look more live than just scanning it and putting it in my cut. but i also want to preserve the vintage look of the expired film.

I can use k40 or Tri-x. I know that. But i was just wondering if i can take advantage of the agfa.

Thank you. Any other advise or comments are welcomed.
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#5 Christian Appelt

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Posted 07 August 2005 - 12:58 PM

Well, as I said before, you certainly can expect heavy grain and lack of contrast, maybe an unpredictable color shift. It depends on the photographs you want to film, do they have high contrast or are they faded or low contrast? In the latter case, I would prfer Kodachrome or Tri-X, but Tri-X gives more grain.
Depends on what effect you would like to achieve. If you just want to use the film process as a kind of "historic filter", I recommend using Kodachrome and desaturate it later in the process. Try more than one exposure setting, then you can choose what fits you best.
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 08 August 2005 - 03:27 PM

Unprocessed film is a perishable item --- it changes with age. Refrigeration slows down the aging process, but does not stop it, as ambient radiation (e.g., cosmic rays) hit the unexposed grains over a long period of time.
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#7 Marty Hamrick

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Posted 12 August 2005 - 05:10 PM

all my moviechrome 40 and 160 footage from the early 80s have emulsion fungus, k40 from the same era is perfect. A  friends collection of films from the mid 80s that were originated on agfa and dixons film stocks have gone the same way. Be very carefull not to record something that cannot easily be re-shot on your moviechrome stock. I would put the cost of processing towards glorious kodachrome instead and bin the moviechrome 40. Andy

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



I had that very same problem with some footage I shot from that era.There was very little color and you could see the fungus in spots in the lighter areas.Processing will be expensive as I doubt it's an E-6.They will probably have to special process it in a separate run from everthing else and change the chemistry after they run it due to the fungus.
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#8 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 15 August 2005 - 01:23 PM

Why all this fascination with using outdated film? :rolleyes: As film gets well beyond its normal age, or is stored improperly, results become very unpredictable. Any savings in stock are usually completely lost if you have to reshoot, or use a specialized process.
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#9 Machado

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Posted 17 August 2005 - 05:56 PM

Why all this fascination with using outdated film?    :rolleyes:  As film gets well beyond its normal age, or is stored improperly, results become very unpredictable.  Any savings in stock are usually completely lost if you have to reshoot, or use a specialized process.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



I use outdated film for the simple fact that I home process color reversal and nobody is offering anything currently which I can process at home!

Perhaps If 64T would hurry up already, I wouldn't have to worry about it..

That said, I have processed agfa moviechrome at home in E-6 with very satisfactory results. I don't know if this film will deteriorate faster or not, but I'm taking precautions with the storage of all my film regardless.

Anyhow, If anyone has any of this old film, I'll buy it from you If you don't want it! :D Remember though, your selling it cheap because it sucks! ;)
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