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past another kodachrome vs. ektachrome thd.


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#1 ClosetCraig

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 09:56 PM

I hear that ektachrome is a highspeed film while kodachrome is a slow speed film. I hear that ektachrome is still being manufactured while kodachrome is not. I hear that ektacrhome is not for shooting bright images while kodachrome is ideal for it. when there is no kodachrome left will ektachrome suffice? Are any of these true/false? Also, does anyone know the difference in film grain/texture between the two?
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 10:05 PM

I hear that ektachrome is a highspeed film while kodachrome is a slow speed film. I hear that ektachrome is still being manufactured while kodachrome is not. I hear that ektacrhome is not for shooting bright images while kodachrome is ideal for it. when there is no kodachrome left will ektachrome suffice? Are any of these true/false? Also, does anyone know the difference in film grain/texture between the two?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Kodak is offering E64T for users wanting a color reversal Super-8 film, so it is a tungsten balance like K40, and 2/3 stop faster. Tone scale and color reproduction of the E64T are slightly different than K40, generally in a less contrasty direction. Most users testing E64T are noticing that it is sharper than K40, but has slightly more graininess.

One big advantage is that the E-6 process is simpler than the K-14 process, to the extent that it can even be done at home. So more labs are likely to offer E-6 Super-8 processing, and there will be more processing options than the two remaining labs that process Super-8 KODACHROME film.

One issue is that some cameras cannot automatically read the speed notches for a 64T film, and will expose it as a 40T film, even though 64T is recognized by the SMPTE standard.
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#3 Carl Weston

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 10:07 PM

I hear that ektachrome is a highspeed film while kodachrome is a slow speed film. I hear that ektachrome is still being manufactured while kodachrome is not. I hear that ektacrhome is not for shooting bright images while kodachrome is ideal for it. when there is no kodachrome left will ektachrome suffice? Are any of these true/false? Also, does anyone know the difference in film grain/texture between the two?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

ektachrome is hardly a fast speed film..kodachrome's ASA is 40... ektachrome ASA is 64....they are both slow speed films...
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#4 Scot McPhie

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Posted 11 August 2005 - 06:45 AM

Try this thread and this one too - but watch all the guff in the first one!

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#5 John Adolfi

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 06:09 AM

Kodak is offering E64T for users wanting a color reversal Super-8 film




John, I thought the E64T was a negative film. Sorry did I miss something? Are you saying that the new super 8 film is a positive, reversal & projectable film?
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#6 Nate Downes

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 08:40 AM

John, I thought the E64T was a negative film.  Sorry did I miss something?  Are you saying that the new super 8 film is a positive, reversal & projectable film?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


E64T is a positive, reversal & projectable film that can also be cross-processed as a negative if you so chose to. It's one of the most flexible options seen for Super8 yet.
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#7 Matt Pacini

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 12:56 PM

Maybe, but I fear I'll never be happy with anything but Kodachrome in Super 8, because i don't like excessive grain, & so far, I've not seen anything that comes close to the fine grain of K40 in S8, and I doubt this 64T is going to look good enough for those of us who can "barely" tolerate the grain of K40.
:(

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#8 A.Oliver

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 02:58 PM

Matt, i quite agree with your comments, my concern is a question of longevity,will it last as long as kodachrome. BTW, the only stock that came close to k40, well actually performs k40 is double super 8 k25. I am afraid it blows k40 away. ( bolex h8, 12.5mm prime and k25, stunning super 8 images). i spent a pile of money on k25 ds-8, just hope kodak can process the stuff in 18months time. Andy

Edited by k25rip, 16 August 2005 - 02:59 PM.

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#9 S8 Booster

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Posted 16 August 2005 - 05:21 PM

why so allergic to grain? film is grain and beauty. e64 seems to yield great sharpness at the price of some grain and for those of you that work with digital finals only.- the 64 seems much easier to tweak in post than k40 - this far.

s
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#10 Matt Pacini

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Posted 17 August 2005 - 01:49 PM

I like film grain, but it's all in respect to the grain size, in relation to the frame size.
A bit of texture is one thing.
The appearance of a gnat storm in front of your camera, is quite another!


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#11 Filip Plesha

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Posted 17 August 2005 - 04:00 PM

I think I might contribute a few words about this film from my use of it in still photography.

I think 64T is not a very big jump from Kodachrome in terms of how "classic" the image looks. Kodachrome had a very retro look (reminding of 70's and pre 70's photography look). 64T does have different image dynamics, but it doesn't look as modern as other current E6 films. Which is good I think because It seems to me many super8 users after a "vintage" look. 64T doesn't really look as "vintage" as Kodachrome did, in my subjective opinion, it looks kind of 80's in terms of colors. I like that about it.

Considering my experiences with it in still photography, I thought it would look too grainy in super8, but judging by the early posted tests, it's not so bad.
If I could find a cheap super8 camera and processing in my country, I might be tempted to start shooting super8, because EPY is one of my favorite still films.

What I like most about this film is its smooth contrast. For example E100VS has these black holes for shadows, which have so little underexposure latitude, and every tone that falls under the mid exposure gets eaten by shadows. It gives a punchy strong look, but if you underexpose the image by one stop it gets so dark and dense.

64T on the other hand, underexposes similar to negative film: you get a nice smooth darker image, not consumed by shadow. It's because it falls to the shadows in a nice linear way.
It also has a very blue-cyan underexposure, it seems the more exposure you give it it becomes more neutral regarding color balance.

With 3200K it is pure white, with 3400K (that I use) it gives a nice cooler look, which I like very much.
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