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DSR-450WS slow shutter


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#1 Peter J DeCrescenzo

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Posted 12 August 2005 - 12:00 PM

[I've edited this message to now include the second image, the one using the Slow Shutter. See below.]

Several people have asked me to post example images from my new DSR-450WS camcorder showing its Slow Shutter feature.

I'm always a bit skeptical of test images posted on the internet because there's only so much one can determine by looking at (usually) compressed video frames captured any one of a thousand different ways. For my part, I'm not an engineer, so there may be a better way to do this, but here they are, as is.

Both of these images were captured via Firewire via the DV codec, so they're obviously compressed at that point.

I further compressed them using JPEG at 95% compression with no smoothing so they'd "fit" just within cinematography.com's 100K upload limit.

Both images were taken moments apart in a very dimly lit room. The subject is a Macbeth color chip chart. For both images the camera was set to its factory "Standard" default settings. Since the Slow Shutter is an interlaced mode feature, the cam was set to interlaced mode. The cam's gain was set at -3 and the lens iris was wide open at f-1.7.

In the first image ("DSR-450WS 1-60 Macbeth.jpg") the cam's shutter is at the "normal" 1/60th-sec. setting. It's almost completely black.
DSR_450WS_1_60_Macbeth.jpg

[begin edit]

In the next image ("DSR-450WS SS Macbeth.jpg") the cam's shutter is in Slow Shutter mode set at 1/1.9 sec., its slowest setting. So even though the light level in the room is very dark, the chart is easy to see. Of course, had there been any movement in this scene it would be quite blurred.
DSR_450WS_SS_Macbeth.jpg

Now that I've upgraded my forum membership (thanks Tim!) I can post more DSR-450WS images. Stay tuned.

All the best,

- Peter DeCrescenzo

Edited by Peter DeCrescenzo, 16 August 2005 - 11:18 AM.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 August 2005 - 06:26 PM

The two things to test are a normal shutter shot to a slow-shutter version, and one should be of some normal movement, and the other of something that shows resolution, like a chart with fine lines. But you need a side-by-side frame comparison of the slow-shutter to the normal shutter version to see if there is any loss of quality.
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#3 Dave Hall

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 11:17 AM

Well, in another post I just got done writing that no one has demonstrated the slow shutter with the 450... but now I see this thread. Would you compare the slow shutter of the 450 to be similar to the PD-150 or 170? When Sony tried to show me the slow shutter effect at DV Expo, it was obviously not working right, because there was no blurring when you panned, or when there was motion in the scene. Could you use loads of ND and do a slow shutter shot with traffic (or anything moving) vs. the normal shutter speed for us? Sorry to bother you with this, but the slow shutter is practically a deal breaker for me right now. I really want the slow shutter, and now I have proof it exists! (A Sony guy told me (after not being able to demostrate it) that only the PAL version of the 450 had the slow shutter! Then the next sentence out of his mouth was "why do you want to use a slow shutter? Just do it in post!" That's when I walked away shaking my head. Thanks, Peter, by the way, for all your great testing posts. You're very similar to me in your meticulousness! And I believe you're helping Sony sell more 450s! (or at least one more)

Edited by Dave Hall, 09 September 2005 - 11:18 AM.

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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 11:24 AM

Hi,

I am at this very moment cutting a sequence with slow shutter done in post:

It's not perfect, there is visible segmentation, but I was frankly pretty impressed - I expected worse.

Obviously this isn't the best way, but just for reference...

Phil

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#5 Simon Wyndham

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Posted 10 September 2005 - 03:36 PM

I haven't examined the slow shutter of the 510 at great detail, but I haven't noticed any resolution degredation on the tests that I have done. I was under the impression that it created the effect by layering frames. I can check with a Sony rep if you like.
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