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first 35mm shoot, question on unloading


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#1 fromkey jenkins

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Posted 13 August 2005 - 10:08 PM

My background is in 16mm and this is my first 35mm shoot. So I have one big silly question... in 16mm you put a core on the take up reel, but in 35mm there is no core on the take up reel (arri 2c mag)... so when I unload this thing do I take the core from the feed and reinsert it into the exposed film? do I just send the film to the lab without a core? if I send the fim without a core, do I need to tape the interior so it doesn't unravel?

-fromkey
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#2 Tomas Koolhaas

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Posted 14 August 2005 - 01:19 AM

Hello,
I have never used the 2C but whenever I use a 35 camera with a colapsible core (such as the BL) I always give the film to the lab with no core, I have never had any complaints from the lab, I would assume you should do the same with the film from the 2C.
Cheers.
Tomas.
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#3 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 14 August 2005 - 02:21 AM

if you would work for only one day in a lab, you would understand why it is better to put the core back in. During transportation sometimes the reels get dropped and are oval, not round when they get to the darkroom.

Trying to get a core back in is timeconsuming and frustrating even more so when the loader asks to 'save the tail'.
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 09:33 AM

I agree, always preferred to put a core back in to maintain roll integrity during shipping. Using the black bag provides an extra measure of protection and prevents shifting of the roll in the can.

NEVER put tape on the interior of the roll. If the lab operator misses it, it could go into the processing machine and "gum up the works". :(
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#5 Larry Nielsen

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Posted 20 August 2005 - 12:52 AM

I find the best thing to do is not to include a core in the exposed negative, doing so my damage the negative itself. On Panavision shows where a core is required on the take up sdie of the mag, it is popped out at the lab any how, so a core really isnt required. The IIc as well as other older Arri mags have no take up core at all, just a clip that locks the film in place for the take up side, it will be wound tight enough as not to cone on you when you download the mag, have fun, i hope that helps, and good shooting
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