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35mm negative in a still photography cartridge


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#1 Demian Barba

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 11:53 AM

Hi,


I heard of this practice before. Anyone knows where I can get both Kodak and Fuji stocks?

I can't see the use of shooting test with these if they end printed on paper. Is it possible to make a positive print? Then I can cut the individual frames and treat them as slides so I can project them.

Or perhaps I can scan them put them on Final Cut and then to Mini DV so I can see them on a monitor?

Are any of this ideas good and worth trying? I am aware that the still frame is bigger than the motion picture frame and therefore fine grained and sharper. But I imagine that all the other qualities of the film stock will remain intact, including exposure latitude.

I am hoping that it is cheaper than collecting a bunch of short-ends and that I can get hold of a wide array of stocks.


Thanks,

Demian Barba,
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#2 Nathan Milford

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 01:05 PM

You used to be able to get motion picture film repackaged in 36 exposure still rolls from RGB Labs but they went out of business You could get it mounted on slides or transparencies. I'm sure someone will chime in with who might do it now.. or at least process it, you may have to repackage it. I'm sure there is a thread on here somewhere.

You can get yourself a half-frame still camera allowing you to shoot the same frame size as motion picture cameras (4 perfs vertical instead of 8 perf horizontal 35mm). The DOP Shop has a PL Mounted half-frame still camera for a grand or so (I think)... It'd be great to use the lenses you're planning on using with the stock.
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#3 Sol Train Saihati

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 01:33 PM

If you phone up your local kodak or fuji rep they'll help you out, although you will almost certainly have to load the film onto reels yourself. Like mmilford said, if you use a standard 35mm still camera the size of the frame won't match a 35mm cine frame as the film is exposed "lengthways", so it might be worth looking at a half frame camera...

Also, depending on what stock you are using there are some pretty comparable still stocks on the market, again Kodak or Fuji will be able to help you out and for exposure tests this would be a good way to go.

It might also be worth doing some research on the Kodak Look Management System and hiring the neccessary equipment although I'm not sure what the ultimate cost will be?
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 03:53 PM

It's very difficult to really make valid judgements comparing motion picture stocks from still frames projected as slides. Rare to get perfectly matched color balance, as motion picture labs can't do frame-to-frame color correction. Perception of graininess is very influenced by motion and the randomness of the grain pattern from frame to frame.

You can see demos from Kodak, and of course learn what a cinematographer used to get a particular "look" that you want.

Here's the Kodak data:

http://www.kodak.com...0.1.4.4.4&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...omparison.jhtml
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#5 Dominic Case

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 07:33 PM

Rare to get perfectly matched color balance, as motion picture labs can't do frame-to-frame color correction

A simple compromise resolves this. Instead of shooting single frames on your still camera, shoot in batches of three. THis still gives you about ten different exposures on a single 36-exp cassette (it's wise not to shoot right to the end, as motion picture processing machines require a couple of frames-worth of neg to join onto the next reel).

The lab should be able to make grading corrections if they are no closer together than about 20 perfs (your three frames would be 24 perfs). Of course they will need instructions that explain what you have done.

But check out what you will be charged and what the turnaround time would be. It's not a normal practice for a motion picture lab, nor a vey convenient one, so you'll have to pay accordingly - if the lab is prepared to take it on at all.
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#6 Mike Crane

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Posted 18 August 2005 - 09:17 PM

Spectra Film and Video bought out some of the equipment from RGB. They plan to offer processing services for ECN-2 and E-6 still films in the next month or so. Here they are: Spectra Film and Video
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#7 Demian Barba

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 05:20 PM

Thanks,

I appreciate the input.



Demian Barba
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