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#1 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 12:12 PM

For my next film I want to play alot with underexposure. I am hoping to shoot on super 16mm (SR3) and 500T. My question is how can I achieve a underexposed look with yellowish hot spots. For example if anyone has the seen the trailer for Tony Scotts new movie Domino, you will know exactly what I am talking about.
Thanks Mario C. Jackson
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 12:49 PM

Underexposure typically increases graininess and reduces shadow detail in the final image. In a print, the density of the black areas are is typically lower, giving a "smoky" or "milky" appearance.
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#3 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 01:04 PM

So how can I achieve the graininess, color contrast and deep dark shadows found in Domino
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#4 timHealy

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 01:52 PM

I'm not sure if I understand your question. Are you thinking about about underexposure and that's it, or underexposure and pushing the film?

It looks to me that the film is exposed properly but the windows and such are completely blown out so that stuff is way overexposed.

Having underexposed portions are fine as long as there are properly exposed or overexposed parts included in the image. Like a window or a light. It even could be an out of focus bare bulb in the background.

Personally, I think underexposure by itself, with no bright proper exposure or overexposure areas is bad news for your image. Better to expose properly and print down in post. So at least you have the info in the negative.

Just curious about where you going?

Best

Tim

PS it looks to me that they may have used a lot of color correct in post via a digital intermediate.
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 02:26 PM

So how can I achieve the graininess, color contrast and deep dark shadows found in Domino

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


"Domino" is going for the look of cross-processed reversal, which is really high-contrast. Whether they are really doing that (as they did for "Man on Fire") or faking it using a D.I., I don't know.

But for starters, if shooting negative, try underexposing one stop and pushing two stops (thus ending up with a one-stop over-dense negative) and then printing down.
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#6 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 19 August 2005 - 02:43 PM

Thanks everyone for your advice. I will keep everything in mind during production.
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