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#1 Paul Bruening

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Posted 21 August 2005 - 07:28 PM

Hello,

I assume that 5242 is a negative (single step), not reversal, intermediate stock. Is that correct? Kodak's site tells me everything about this stock except that simple fact. Will it respond to a CRT recorder well whether the digital images are in positive or negative presentation? Do I understand correctly that it responds well to laser and CRT recordation as it picks up less of the fogging of bounced light, especially, on the CRT type?

That's three questions. Anyone game for some feedback?
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 22 August 2005 - 10:35 PM

Hello,

I assume that 5242 is a negative (single step), not reversal, intermediate stock. Is that correct? Kodak's site tells me everything about this stock except that simple fact. Will it respond to a CRT recorder well whether the digital images are in positive or negative presentation? Do I understand correctly that it responds well to laser and CRT recordation as it picks up less of the fogging of bounced light, especially, on the CRT type?

That's three questions. Anyone game for some feedback?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Here's the technical data:

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.6.4.4&lc=en

It is a negative film --- increased exposure results in increased density. Gamma/contrast is near 1.0. Most often used and well suited to laser recording. Quite slow, limiting use with CRTs.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 23 August 2005 - 12:31 AM

It's a negative stock, but when you copy it to the same stock, then next generation therefore becomes a positive. Hence why IP's and IN's use the same stock.

CRT recorders generally use 5245 or Fuji F-64D camera negative stock, although some have been using 5205 lately. Intermediate dupe stock is too slow for CRT recorders.
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#4 Dominic Case

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Posted 23 August 2005 - 07:34 PM

I assume that 5242 is a negative (single step), not reversal, intermediate stock. Is that correct?Kodak's site tells me everything about this stock except that simple fact. 

Yes it's a negative. The sensitometric curves actually show you that - more exposure results in more density. So exposure to a positive image would result in a negative image, while exposure to a negative image would result in a positive image. You can set your CRT - or laser - recorder to either mode, provided you have LUTs that work accordingly.

Will it respond to a CRT recorder well whether the digital images are in positive or negative presentation?

As already said, it's a bit slow for a CRT recorder, though some machines that drive the CRT really hard can be used. However, driving CRTs hard tends to add reduce resolution as the spot gets bigger.

Do I understand correctly that it responds well to laser and CRT recordation as it picks up less of the fogging of bounced light, especially, on the CRT type?

Flare is an issue with CRTs, but slightly less so when using intermediate stock 5242 as its higher contrast pushes unwanted flare further down the curve. However, driving the tube harder tends to work against that effect, so you may not be much better off.

That's three answers to three questions.
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#5 Paul Bruening

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Posted 23 August 2005 - 09:56 PM

John, Dominic, and David:

Thank you very much for your answers. They were exactly what I needed. I'll run tests on the mentioned stocks and see what reults they provide.

Again, thanks!
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