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Which 35mm camera to buy?


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#1 kalkarman

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Posted 22 August 2005 - 04:59 PM

I'd like to buy a 35mm camera to buy for personal projects.

I'm attracted to the AATON Minima, but would prefer to go 35mm.

Can anyone suggest a good and reasonably priced camera to buy?

Many thanks,

Kal
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#2 Tim Tyler

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Posted 22 August 2005 - 05:07 PM

What's your budget?
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#3 Steven Budden

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Posted 22 August 2005 - 09:56 PM

An Aaton Minima would be sweet though.

Steven
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 23 August 2005 - 04:21 AM

I'd like to buy a 35mm camera to buy for personal projects.

I'm attracted to the AATON Minima, but would prefer to go 35mm.

Can anyone suggest a good and reasonably priced camera to buy?

Many thanks,

Kal

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Hi,

The best value in 35mm is Ultracam. I bought my second Ultracam Package last week.
Only 15 cameras ever made! Repairs could be an issue. Prices tend to be $10-15000 with Zeiss Super Speed lens set.

Stephen
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#5 Paul Bruening

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Posted 23 August 2005 - 09:40 PM

Gee, Stephen. Seems like an Arri 535 would be enough for home movies. Imagine the wife and kids, pool-side, in scope, 60 feet wide at the local cinema.

Seriously, there are so many fine cameras out there at various pricing. Budget may be your final determinant. I've got an Arri IIB. It sounds like industrial machinery running. My Mitchell BNC is like shooting with a dumptruck as a camera. However, they were cheap and at least put me in 35mm even with all the blimping and other hassles.

Most DPs want a camera for all occaisions since that's what they do. So, they have to shell out the cheese to do that. If you're directing your own stuff, you may be able to change your directing style to accomodate an older cam with a blimp or other such limitation.

Oddly enough, what DPs here seem to agonize over, more, is their lenses. You should think about what venue your stuff has a chance to show in. If you're stuck, like so many of us, with showing your stuff at film festivals off of a DVD then flat lenses (non-anamorphic) of lower price do fine, given that they're not goofed up in some way. I have a set of Snotter Krudnutts on my old, academy framed Arri and they look great when played back at DVD resolutions. And, brother, were they cheap to get.

If your ambitions are the big screen, then you might as well shoot scope. Most DPs just rent the really good ones like Cooke, Zeiss and their ilk

I know that's not a direct recomendation. But, it may be useful in your selection strategy.
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#6 Nate Downes

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Posted 24 August 2005 - 08:44 AM

A Mitchell BNC or a russian Konvas might do the job for you for pretty cheap. Mitchell's a bit large (altho I would love to own one) and the Konvas is a bit harder to get parts for, but they're both inexpensive.
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#7 Jonathan Spear

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Posted 24 August 2005 - 11:53 AM

With a properly lit set and appropriate set design, great lenses and/or filters, and a proper post production treatment could you get that Hollywood "look" to your work or is that only reserved for the kind of cameras most of us can't afford?

In other words, two identicle sets - both for 35mm projection - will a Konvas or Mitchell yeild the same results as an Arri 535 (or any other $$$ camera)?
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#8 zrszach

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Posted 24 August 2005 - 12:13 PM

With a properly lit set and appropriate set design, great lenses and/or filters, and a proper post production treatment could you get that Hollywood "look" to your work or is that only reserved for the kind of cameras most of us can't afford?

In other words, two identicle sets - both for 35mm projection - will a Konvas or Mitchell yeild the same results as an Arri 535 (or any other $$$ camera)?

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Yes you can. But you must remember that there is a lot of expensive work done in post on these ?big budget? films. As far as the camera, if the Konvas has the same lenses, filters, and film. The footage will look the same prior to post. Now if you have all the money to spend on HI-Res transfers and DI?s then you?re fine.
I myself have read many articles about big time feature films using older 35-3, 2c.
And of course the Eyemo 35.
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#9 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 24 August 2005 - 12:29 PM

With a properly lit set and appropriate set design, great lenses and/or filters, and a proper post production treatment could you get that Hollywood "look" to your work or is that only reserved for the kind of cameras most of us can't afford?

In other words, two identicle sets - both for 35mm projection - will a Konvas or Mitchell yeild the same results as an Arri 535 (or any other $$$ camera)?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


The camera affects image quality in two basic characteristics:

1. Can the camera advance and register each frame of film precisely (steadiness)?

2. Can the camera consistently hold the film flat in the plane of focus (focus uniformity)?

Beyond those, the lens is the primary equipment-related determinant of image quality. All other camera features are related to how quiet the camera is, ergonomics, weight, flexibility, etc. Mitchell BNC cameras were the "workhorse" of Hollywood for thousands of feature films and television shows that helped define the "Hollywood Look" through the early 1970's:

http://www.samdodge....te/MITCHELL.HTM

http://www.filmcentre.co.uk/Hammer.htm

The Mitchell BNC was the camera of choice for major motion picture production from just before the beginning of World War II through to the advent of the Mitchell BNCR in December 1967. The first was made in August of 1934, the second in August, 1935, and third in January 1937. Because of the war, there was only one camera made between 1939 and 1946, (serial no 18, in June of 1941). After the war production by Mitchell Camera Corp. increased dramatically and by 1947 they were making 32 a year, (serial nos 32 through 64). The age of Hollywood in the 1950s' was about to roll and a Mitchell BNC was still the camera of choice, but Mitchell were unable to satisfy world demand and for several years a copy was made under licence by Newall Engineering Ltd. in Peterborough, England.
Mitchell manufactured 364 BNCs, (#1-365, there is no #13), many now over 60 years old, are still the work horse of the animation and motion control industry, renowned for the precision and accuracy of the film transport mechanism -better that of many modern cameras.


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#10 Nate Downes

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Posted 24 August 2005 - 05:01 PM

With a properly lit set and appropriate set design, great lenses and/or filters, and a proper post production treatment could you get that Hollywood "look" to your work or is that only reserved for the kind of cameras most of us can't afford?

In other words, two identicle sets - both for 35mm projection - will a Konvas or Mitchell yeild the same results as an Arri 535 (or any other $$$ camera)?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


The Mitchell moreso than the Konvas, but yes. The Konvas doesn't have as solid a registration as the Arri, but the Mitchell does.

Just use a good lens set, matching, and you'd go far.
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#11 Nate Downes

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Posted 24 August 2005 - 05:03 PM

The camera affects image quality in two basic characteristics:

1. Can the camera advance and register each frame of film precisely (steadiness)?

2. Can the camera consistently hold the film flat in the plane of focus (focus uniformity)?

Beyond those, the lens is the primary equipment-related determinant of image quality.  All other camera features are related to how quiet the camera is, ergonomics, weight, flexibility, etc.  Mitchell BNC cameras were the "workhorse" of Hollywood for thousands of feature films and television shows that helped define the "Hollywood Look" through the early 1970's:

http://www.samdodge....te/MITCHELL.HTM

http://www.filmcentre.co.uk/Hammer.htm

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John, you're making me long for the Mitchell that I so desperately want all the more by posting those. 8)
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Rig Wheels Passport

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The Slider

FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

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