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Super-8 Camera Investments


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#1 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 24 August 2005 - 09:06 AM

If any of use get into scenarios where it's possible to make income from shooting Super-8, what is the minimum amount of gear you should own, and bring to the shoot, to justify being paid to shoot Super-8?
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#2 Nate Downes

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Posted 24 August 2005 - 03:57 PM

Depends on the gig, but I typically go with 2-3 cameras, my Chinons being the most often used ones.
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#3 Matt Pacini

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Posted 25 August 2005 - 06:02 PM

I think a good lighting rig, maybe a whellchair dolly or equivalent, and skill, are going to be better than a bunch of cameras.
Shooting with more than one camera burns up mondo film stock.
I shot a feature with two cameras on hand, but rarely used more than one at a time;
It's a bitch to light for two cameras, and the film goes REALLY FAST that way.
If you can afford that much film stock, you should be shooting 16mm film, which by the way, increases your odds of getting paid gigs by about 1,000%.

MP
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#4 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 25 August 2005 - 06:21 PM

I think a good lighting rig, maybe a whellchair dolly or equivalent, and skill, are going to be better than a bunch of cameras.
Shooting with more than one camera burns up mondo film stock.
I shot a feature with two cameras on hand, but rarely used more than one at a time;
It's a bitch to light for two cameras, and the film goes REALLY FAST that way.
If you can afford that much film stock, you should be shooting 16mm film, which by the way, increases your odds of getting paid gigs by about 1,000%.

MP

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


If someone hires you to do some type of Super-8 shoot, how many cameras one brings should take into account the possibility that the main camera could develop a problem, and because Super-8 cameras have so many potential options no one camera actually offers all of options.

The way I see it, two or three cameras are the absolute minimium to bring. Two of the identical primary camera, plus a b-camera that offers additional features not found on the main cameras. Unless it's absolutely a given that the additional features would never be needed, in that case, than two super-8 cameras is the minimum I would bring.

Matt, I don't think anyone is saying shoot two cameras at the same time. Since Super-8 cameras are smaller and much less expensive, bringing three to a shoot should take no more space than one 16mm camera, and the purchase price should still be less.

I'm not trying to make this a super-8 versus 16mm issue either, simply setting forth the idea that showing up with only one super-8 camera for a paid gig is probably not a wise idea. (unless one is concerned that there is no place to keep the other two standby cameras.)
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Visual Products

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