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Instructional Video


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#1 Kyle Geerkens

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Posted 28 August 2005 - 10:50 AM

I'm shooting a relatively simple instuctional video for a beekeeping product this month. I'm doing it for peanuts because it's a small company that needs some promotional material.

I'll be shooting on either the dvx100A or a Panasonic dvcpro 400 camera. Not sure which yet. Any suggestions? I'm leaning towards the dvx.

Most (or all)of this video will be outside in a bee field. I have access to some power from the warehouse with a lot of extension cables, but will be trying to keep it minimalistic for time and money issues.

Now I'm thinking this will be a sunny day look, so whether the sun is out or not, I'll key with a 750hmi through half white diffusion to soften the shadows slightly, and keep a nice shallow DOF to make sure the subject stands out.

I've seen so many things like this that look very flat, so I'm trying to avoid this obviously, I was going to warm up the actor's face with the same hmi light with 1/4 CTO.

I'd love some suggestions to make this stand out more, is there any use in having any kicker in broad daylight, will it even be noticeable?

Also when I go in for coverage within the hives, any suggestions on lighting that to eliminate shadows as much as possible. As most of you can imagine, an open beehive, has 8 verticle trays that will wreck havoc with shadwos peering down into the box itself.

I hope this makes sense,


Thanks for any input.
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#2 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 28 August 2005 - 01:22 PM

Hi,

I don't know about the dvx100 - though I've read good things about it here and there - but I work everyday with the dvcpro 25 panasonic AJD 400 at the school I teach and I can tell you I consider this camera's image is pure crap.

I would always consider a DSR 300/500 Sony looks very much better. If you can have a Panasonic AJD 610 or 800, it will be closer to the Sonys.

About the light I guess you're talking of 575 W HMI...
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#3 Kyle Geerkens

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Posted 28 August 2005 - 02:35 PM

hi,


sorry, Ya that was a typo, i was thinking about 750 tungstens that i have available to use too. Youre right it is the 575 hmi.

I also agree, the 400 is crap. haha. I'm just trying to avoid rental as much as possible if I can find stuff that's availbale freely to me.

Any suggestions on the lighting?

Thanks again
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#4 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 28 August 2005 - 02:38 PM

You mean a 650 tungsten ?
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#5 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 28 August 2005 - 02:39 PM

If it's a sunny day there's no need to use lights. You can reflect, bounce, block and shade your object any way you want.

Get a big butterfly with silk so that you can soften the sun in direct light. Get a couple of shinyboards or polyboards to use as 'kick' and your almost there.

Good luck.
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#6 Michael Nash

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Posted 29 August 2005 - 12:00 PM

I'm with Adam on this one; keep it simple and use what the sun gives you. You may still want your HMI as fill light for looking down into the "bee box" (whatever that's called), or anywhere else that it might be difficult to angle a reflector into.

I wouldn't use tungsten to warm up the talent's face when outside, it's just going to make him look orange or else make the video look cheap.

Unfortunately you're not going to get a shallow depth of field outdoors with the DVX, unless you're 100 feet away on a long lens. So you'll have to find other ways to achieve separation. Try to stage you talent against a contrasting background, and use an edge light (gently) if you feel it helps.

But really this kind of thing calls for a gentle, simple touch. Just block and compose nice looking shots, add fill where necessary with bounce boards (white or silver), and scrim off the harshest parts of sunlight (like maybe when you go close on the hives).
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#7 Greg Gross

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Posted 29 August 2005 - 01:24 PM

What ASA are you shooting dv at? You could use HMI and kicker if you wanted
to. It would make for a lot of hardwork though. Have you ever seen "The Day of
The Locust"?, Conrad Hall ASC. You can see rim lighting and kicker type lighting
in the scene at the zoo(daylight),check out the way he lit Karen Black in this scene.
Do you really want a lot of softer bounced light? Or do you want to have it a little
harder? If you are going to use available/ambient light you will have to be aware
of the changing light. I think of the bee as a busy bee,bright in color,hyperactive,
in fields of flowers or around trees in an orchard. Fallen apples or fruit lying on the
ground. I wondered maybe if you would want to rim light the hair of your actor?
Oh well this is only one method,one way to light. I think of the bee as a bright busy
fellow in fields of bright,sunlit flowers. So I would want to use slightly harder light.
Of course you could bounce or diffuse with HMI's. I'm thinking you'll need some ND
filtration. The use of other filtration of course will be up to you and your vision. I
realize though that your hands may be tied by an art director/ad agency etc.. I wish
you luck with your shoot and please post here on forum as to your method of light-
ing the scene.

Greg Gross
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#8 Kyle Geerkens

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Posted 31 August 2005 - 10:33 AM

I will post what i have done, thanks to all suggestions.


My hands aren't tied by any agency luckily. But they are tied by the beekeeper. He wants it to be long, but finished quickly. Therefore I'm going to talk to him about what hes looking for in terms of imagery. He may just wast the basics, and thats what I'll give him (with my own touch in there to stave off boredom haha)

Because he's an old employer of mine, I have given him a Huge deal on my rate, so im also tied up by trying to equip myself for the least money possible.

Any suggestions of drawsing up a contract for something llike this?

he wants like 10-15 mins for this instructional video. But it will be a lot of easy shots all in one place with coverage so It wont take way too long.

right now ive quoted my services at 1000 for one day of shooting and the final edit.


Kyle
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The Slider

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

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