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Tape to Film Facility Recommendations


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#1 barryagilbert

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Posted 29 August 2005 - 01:01 PM

Hi,

I have recently completed a 15 minute short film shot on 35mm, transferred to D5, offlined and now being conformed back to D5 for eventual burn out for a 35mm answer print.

I would be deeply interested in feedback as to which is the "best" facility or facilities to perform a tape to film transfer, most likely in the L.A. area. In particular has anyone had any experience with IVC, E-film or DuArt? Cost is somewhat of a consideration for this indie filmmaker, but weighed carefully in regards to quality...

many thanks,

Barry
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 August 2005 - 02:16 PM

If this is already color-corrected to HD-D5, then most of these facilities use an Arrilaser going to an IN, so there are a lot of similarities, and they can adjust their LUT's to some degree, plus you have some choice of print stock to further tweak contrast and saturation (I tend to prefer Kodak Premier 2393 for film-outs from an HD master.)

EFILM does nice work, Laser Pacific is similar, FotoKem is good but a little more contrasty. I've used FotoKem for the last two film-outs because they were cheaper. I've also used Alpha Cine in Seattle, who are reasonably priced (understanding that laser recording is ridiculously expensive.) Since your project is short, it shouldn't be as bad (maybe $7,000 - $10,000 for the film-out?)
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#3 barryagilbert

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Posted 29 August 2005 - 08:19 PM

If this is already color-corrected to HD-D5, then most of these facilities use an Arrilaser going to an IN, so there are a lot of similarities, and they can adjust their LUT's to some degree, plus you have some choice of print stock to further tweak contrast and saturation (I tend to prefer Kodak Premier 2393 for film-outs from an HD master.)

EFILM does nice work, Laser Pacific is similar, FotoKem is good but a little more contrasty.  I've used FotoKem for the last two film-outs because they were cheaper.  I've also used Alpha Cine in Seattle, who are reasonably priced (understanding that laser recording is ridiculously expensive.) Since your project is short, it shouldn't be as bad (maybe $7,000 - $10,000 for the film-out?)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Thanks for the suggestions - just to further my knowledge base, what's an LUT?

Gracias,

b
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 29 August 2005 - 11:41 PM

Look Up Table. Whatever color and contrast parameters / values that are applied to the digital image so that it reproduces accurately when transferred to a film negative, or for digital projection, etc. You'd think there would be a universal LUT to convert linear video HD for transfer to 35mm IN, but most transfer facilities modify them for their own needs and according to their own tastes, so some places claim that their LUT's are better or more accurate than others, etc.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

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Wooden Camera