Jump to content


what to do to bring this on movie!


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 rajavel

rajavel
  • Guests

Posted 29 August 2005 - 02:38 PM

halo everybody and david. along with this mail i am attaching some snaps which i had taken in the location where i am gona shoot my feature film. this location comes in the movie ....as a flash back sequence....aaround 50 years back....i wanted to give it an interesting look to that sequence. so after fiddling with the still photograph printing...and various color correctins...i have decided to go with this look(above is normal....below snap is the desired look)....first of all..is it worth going for this look....to stay off from the usual sepia or black and white......give ur comments on it and then........how do i go about getting this look...
1) i was planning to use 250 D stock for this. its going to be hot and sunny. and i will have to shoot interior sequences tooo. can u suggest any other stock...and what way will it help to achieve this look
2) i dont have budget for the DI. so i have to create it while shooting. How????
3)can i shoot normally and match this in grading??? this image has got yellow and green
4)will skip bleach or any other technique help?

thnaks.cheers
rajavel oliveeran
  • 0

#2 rajavel

rajavel
  • Guests

Posted 29 August 2005 - 02:40 PM

some more images attached
rajavel oliveeran
  • 0

#3 rajavel

rajavel
  • Guests

Posted 29 August 2005 - 02:42 PM

some more images attached
rajavel oliveeran
  • 0

#4 rajavel

rajavel
  • Guests

Posted 29 August 2005 - 02:48 PM

somw more for the look
rajavel oliveeran
  • 0

#5 rajavel

rajavel
  • Guests

Posted 29 August 2005 - 03:08 PM

last set of images
rajavel oliveeran
  • 0

#6 Tim J Durham

Tim J Durham
  • Sustaining Members
  • 742 posts
  • Director
  • East Coast, Baby!

Posted 29 August 2005 - 04:15 PM

last set of images
rajavel oliveeran

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hi Rajavel,
Since it looks as though you've applied the yellowing effect to the entire image, I'd say you could use a yellow colored black and white filter or maybe a straw, coral or antique suede color filter. Then do a test with different grades til you find the one that works.

If you want to select parts of the image to receive the effect, someone else will have to advise you there. Color grading is not my bailiwick.
  • 0

#7 Jaan Shenberger

Jaan Shenberger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 262 posts
  • Director
  • San Francisco

Posted 29 August 2005 - 04:36 PM

this looks like you've digitally dropped the blue channel's shoulder/white point down to about 50% grey. though this is easy to do digitally, it's very hard to do photochemically.

using the digital bluechannel-drop technique results in no whites whatsoever (they lose half their blue content, making them yellow). to achieve this photochemically, you'd have to make certain that nothing in your shot is exposed over zone7 (a sizeable feat of art direction, makeup & lighting), then have the have the lab time it for the yellow, though this probably wouldn't look as pronounced as the tests you posted. you might be able to get closer to the look you want by also shooting with a yellow filter, but that would affect the relative values of different colors, which your tests do not seem to have.

my suggestion would be to shoot these sequences on reversal with no filtration, exposed normal or maybe one or two stops over, depending on how much yellow you want in the shot. then ask the lab about how they prefer creating a neg with the look you want-- there are a few ways they could do it: either by optically printing to neg with yellow filtration, or by printing to neg two or so stops underexposed and timing the prints for yellow. the technique for the neg would probably depend on how your reversal footage looks. for some occassional examples of "colorized" blown out whites achieved photochemically via reversal-to-neg, check out buffalo 66 shot by lance acord.

or you could just shoot these sequences on a digital format and have the look achieved in post and get a filmout. or just get a DI.

hope this helps,
jaan

Edited by jaan, 29 August 2005 - 04:39 PM.

  • 0

#8 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 29 August 2005 - 07:53 PM

Just looks like a heavy Gold, Straw, or Yellow filter to me...

I'd probably just find a close match with a filter and then tweak the final amount of yellow in timing later. So find a Gold if you can, or Antique Suede, and have it timed for even more yellow in post. But it's such a strong yellow that I wouldn't shoot unfiltered because that would be such an extreme printer light correction to get that yellow.

For indoor scenes, you can use colored gels on lights.
  • 0

#9 rajavel

rajavel
  • Guests

Posted 30 August 2005 - 11:19 AM

Just looks like a heavy Gold, Straw, or Yellow filter to me...

I'd probably just find a close match with a filter and then tweak the final amount of yellow in timing later.  So find a Gold if you can, or Antique Suede, and have it timed for even more yellow in post. But it's such a strong yellow that I wouldn't shoot unfiltered because that would be such an extreme printer light correction to get that yellow.

For indoor scenes, you can use colored gels on lights.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


thanks a lot David. but what stock do u think i should go for this. i wwant a high contrast look for this.thanks.
rajavel
  • 0

#10 rajavel

rajavel
  • Guests

Posted 30 August 2005 - 11:21 AM

thanks tim, jaan and david. hey waht is that zone 7 i have to keep off!! didnt get that. thanks
rajavel
  • 0

#11 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 30 August 2005 - 12:53 PM

For increased contrast:

If this is for a D.I. or just for telecine, then you can add contrast in the color-correction.

If this is for a contact print, you could do one or more of these methods:

Print on Vision Premier or Fuji XD (when it comes out)

Push the negative

Skip-bleach the negative

Skip-bleach the print or use ENR, ACE, etc.

Shoot reversal and optically dupe to an IN

Cross-process reversal into a negative
  • 0

#12 Jaan Shenberger

Jaan Shenberger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 262 posts
  • Director
  • San Francisco

Posted 30 August 2005 - 02:14 PM

thanks tim, jaan and david. hey waht is that zone 7 i have to keep off!! didnt get that. thanks
rajavel

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


the zone7 thing requires a pretty long answer that i'd probably fail to explain in a comprehendable manner. you'd be better off googling "zone system".

but basically, if you were shooting with some kind of yellow filtration and wanted the brightest areas in your image to be yellow and not white, then you'd have to make sure that nothing in your shot meters at more than 2 stops over your shooting stop. if any areas of your image are more than 2 stops over, then they'll be too bright to hold any substantial color information (assuming you plan to process & print normal). and even the areas that are just at 2 stops over probably won't be able to produce the kinds of yellows in your example images.

to me, the defining element to your example images is that the blown out area in the image of the guy sitting in the doorway is rendered a saturated yellow, rather than white, even though it seems to be about 5-6 stops overexposed. this will not happen with filtration-- it'll go to white. but if you can keep everything within 2 stops over, then even the brightest areas will have some yello (of course, this is assuming that you even care about not having any whites in your image). the only real way to have blown out whites end up a saturated yellow would be through digital color correction tools (DI, telecine, etc.) or by shooting reversal and optically printing to neg. if you're concerned about controlling contrast and if the yellows in these examples are exactly what you want, then i'd suggest the digital route-- getting that yellow is a very simple technique and on top of that, you'll have awesome control over contrast.

hope this helps,
jaan
  • 0

#13 Tim J Durham

Tim J Durham
  • Sustaining Members
  • 742 posts
  • Director
  • East Coast, Baby!

Posted 30 August 2005 - 03:34 PM

...if the yellows in these examples are exactly what you want, then i'd suggest the digital route-- getting that yellow is a very simple technique and on top of that, you'll have awesome control over contrast.

hope this helps,
jaan

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

And it has the added benefit of being undone if you change your mind, whereas if you shoot with a yellow filter, changing it later becomes problematic, to say the least.
  • 0

#14 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19759 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 30 August 2005 - 09:44 PM

Sure, but that's not a good reason, the ability to change your mind. If he uses a filter or does it in post, the main reason should be because it's the best way to get the look he wants. Sometimes the post route is the best way. But just saying that he shouldn't commit to a look because he may want a different look later only promotes artistic laziness. The point of cinematography is to have a visual concept for the scene and then use the appropriate technology, whether in camera or in post, to achieve it. Of course you want the ability to fine-tune the concept in post, which is why I generally subscribe to the "halfway" approach (some warmth in the original, then add or subtract or shift to get the final look in post). But I feel that with extreme looks, taking a neutral image into post and pushing it digitally in some extreme direction may not yield the best results.
  • 0

#15 rajavel

rajavel
  • Guests

Posted 30 August 2005 - 10:38 PM

thanks TIm, David & Jaan....that was lot of feed for my brains....technical feed!thanks.will keep u guys informed about the outcome which might be in a month or so......look out. am starting shoot from next month....50 days shoot...with a schedule break 25 -25 may be...bye for now
rajavel
  • 0

#16 Jaan Shenberger

Jaan Shenberger
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 262 posts
  • Director
  • San Francisco

Posted 01 September 2005 - 01:45 AM

rajavel, where are you shooting? in india? (just an assumption from your name & the stills)

if for some chance you're shooting in sri lanka, i have some friends that might wanna help out for free, if you're interested. they may even be willing to come to india.
  • 0

#17 rajavel

rajavel
  • Guests

Posted 02 September 2005 - 01:47 AM

rajavel, where are you shooting? in india? (just an assumption from your name & the stills)

if for some chance you're shooting in sri lanka, i have some friends that might wanna help out for free, if you're interested. they may even be willing to come to india.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


jaan, well am from India and am shooting in India...(u guessed right). i am gona be shooting in a place called Dharmapuri -interior Tamilnadu. thanks a zillion for suggesting help....thats really a great news. hey just pass on ur friend's email id and would contact them. what exactly are they into and how do u think they can help....wont it be too costly for them to be travelling just for this....i will be leaving to this place in a couple of days....and this place might or might not have internet facility even....but anyway there will be a schedule break....before we shoot the second segment....we can see how it goes. i am excited. waiting for ur mail with details and email id. thanks once again.
hey the next time u are in india....count me in. am there to help u out. cheers!
  • 0


rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

The Slider

Tai Audio

Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

CineLab

CineTape

Opal

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Opal

Glidecam