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DSR-450WSL default color, "film", and B&W


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#1 Peter J DeCrescenzo

Peter J DeCrescenzo
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Posted 31 August 2005 - 03:12 AM

EDIT: I changed the MTX LINEAR value (see below) to "-55". I originally typed it as "-52" which was incorrect. - P.D.
===

I'm not sure how useful these images are, but I learned a few things creating them. I hope it's OK to share them here. These images show the results of in-camera adjustments only.

The first image was shot using my DSR-450WSL' default factory standard settings. The cam was also in native 16:9 mode, 0db gain, 24pA, 1/48 sec. shutter, 1/16ND, 5600K preset, with the iris at about f5.6.
DSR450WS_standard.jpg

The next image uses one of the cam's film gamma settings, and also other settings suggested at the end of Simon Wyndham's article on his website. As a result, this image is less contrasty and has less edge enhancement compared to the first image. In addition to Simon's suggestions the cam was set as described above.
DSR450WS_film.jpg

The next image uses the "-55" MTX LINEAR settings I discussed in a recent post. All the settings are the same as were used to create the image above, except now the image is B&W.
DSR450WS_BW_film.jpg

Would including a MacBeth color or grayscale chip chart in the images make them more useful to others?

All the best,

- Peter DeCrescenzo
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#2 Jay Gladwell

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Posted 31 August 2005 - 07:47 AM

Frankly, I prefer the first image. It has more snap to it. The second looks somewhat flat and drab. Just one man's opinion.

Jay
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#3 Tim J Durham

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Posted 31 August 2005 - 08:00 AM

Frankly, I prefer the first image.  It has more snap to it.  The second looks somewhat flat and drab.  Just one man's opinion.

Jay

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yeah,
you can't tell much from one snap-shot with basically two colors in it. However, if you shoot with
more dynamic range (I'll stop using "latitude" interchangeably-thanks to Michael Nash) as would be eventually evident in the second case, there are benefits in doing so that are not apparent in this instance such as retained shadow detail, among others.
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 31 August 2005 - 10:07 AM

Would including a MacBeth color or grayscale chip chart in the images make them more useful to others?

All the best,

- Peter DeCrescenzo

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Hi,

I like the second image better. The first is overcorrected.
Shooting a MycBeth chart would be useful as you can see the horizontal and vertical detail around the colors.

Stephen
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#5 Alvin Pingol

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 01:53 AM

I too prefer the second image to the first, as it looks a lot smoother and less harsh (though it is hard to tell with the subject matter) - less "video". The first image's settings minus the sharpening would probably look pretty good, too. The same test with a MacBeth color checker, plus some high-contrast scenes and landscapes would be a really good test.
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