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HDV or Pro DV?


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#1 Krisztian Tolnay

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Posted 31 August 2005 - 12:38 PM

Hello,

Low budget short film.

I want to go for a less ENG look that 60i/50i provides. Going for a more cinematic look I was thinking about buying the new JVC GY-HD100 HDV...but honestly I feel it's not that "pro" and not production proven yet. The other option is a JVC-DV5100 I could get for approx the same price and even if it's SD it just looks more professional to me. High dynamic range, 1/2 CCDs, result of it's high rez frame mode looks like progressive scan to me. So I think instead of buying the GY-HD100 and using it in the 720p/24 mode I would go for a PAL (25fps/frame mode) GY-DV5100. What do you think?


Thanks!

Krix
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#2 Peter J DeCrescenzo

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Posted 31 August 2005 - 10:05 PM

Hi Krix: Have you considered renting a mid to high-end SD camcorder for your project? Depending on where you're located, many video equipment rental houses offer discounted rates for multi-day rentals.

A progressive-capable 2/3" 16:9 pro cam -- such as the SDX-900 (DVCPRO-50 & DVCPRO-25), or the new and therefore less-common DSR-450WS DVCAM, and a few others -- can produce better-looking video than interlaced cams, especially if your final distribution will include DVD or film-out. And most pro 2/3" cams (interlaced or progressive) can create video which looks better than 1/2" or 1/3" cams.

However, if you're only considering purchasing an interlaced pro cam, take a look at the Ikegami HLDV7AW; it's an amazing 2/3" 16:9 DVCAM cam for the money. Sony's new DSR-400 is a good 2/3" 4:3 DVCAM cam, too. The discontinued, previous model (the DSR-390) can yield great results for a 1/2" 4:3 cam; perhaps you might find a dealer who has one left in stock.

With careful, professionally lighting the Z1 HDV 1/3" cam can produce good results in interlaced 1080i mode, but it generally requires more light than the cams mentioned above. Just don't use its Cineframe fake "24p" mode. Note also that HDV can require somewhat more horsepower in whatever computers handle your post work compared to DV.

All the best,

- Peter DeCrescenzo
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#3 Alvin Pingol

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 02:24 AM

>>With careful, professionally lighting the Z1 HDV 1/3" cam can produce good
>>results in interlaced 1080i mode, but it generally requires more light than the
>>cams mentioned above. Just don't use its Cineframe fake "24p" mode.

I believe his choices were between a DV5100 and the new HD100, which I feel is a significant step up from the Z1.

If your final cut is intended for SD only, I would go for the 5100. It's a much more professional camera with better electronics; the cost of the 5100 body is the same as the HD100 *with* Fujinon ProHD lens...
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