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#1 Ken Minehan

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Posted 31 August 2005 - 09:40 PM

Hey guys, it seems like i have a question for you guys every day.

I recently shot a TV commercial for a skin care company. I was wandering how you guys go about beauty lighting?

I used 2 x day light 4ft 4 bank kino, and a 575 HMI for a shine on the hair. for the back ground a 1.2kw HMI. The conditions were a little bit difficult as it was not shot in a studio. It was a pre-existing house. Also the budget was tight.

How do you guys light on a shoe string budget for beauty products.

PS: It helped that the model was stunningly, jaw droppingly beautiful though. I think she would have still looked good with a red head directed straight at her.
haha!
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#2 Tim J Durham

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Posted 31 August 2005 - 10:23 PM

Hey guys, it seems like i have a question for you guys every day. 

I recently shot a TV commercial for a skin care company.  I was wandering how you guys go about beauty lighting? 

I used 2 x day light 4ft 4 bank kino, and a 575 HMI for a shine on the hair.  for the back ground a 1.2kw HMI.  The conditions were a little bit difficult as it was not shot in a studio.  It was a pre-existing house.  Also the budget was tight.

How do you guys light on a shoe string budget for beauty products.

PS:  It helped that the model was stunningly, jaw droppingly beautiful though.  I think she would have still looked good with a red head directed straight at her.
haha!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Do you have a still from the shoot to post?
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#3 Michael Nash

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Posted 01 September 2005 - 05:03 PM

They say beauty is ion the eye of the beholder, but in this case it's in the face of the talent! You have to find what light looks best for the person you're using. Bone structure, wrinkles and smile lines, prominence of the nose, etc. Every face is different and takes a slightly different light.

That said, the basic approach to "glamour" light is soft frontal light, achieved by any number of means. It also really helps to add some soft, subtle fill light from just below the lens to fill in under the chin and eye sockets, and to give a little extra kick in the eyes.

The TV show I was on for the first half of the year was pretty much all that, shot partly on location. In the field I would use a 400 HMI with a chimera as a key light, above the lens and ever so slightly to the side. I would use another HMI/chimera as a backlight, and angle the chimera until I got the intensity looking right. I used a Kino-flo Diva as a fill light (about eye level and on the opposite side of the key), and dimmed by eye until it "blended" nicely without throwing any noticeable shadows. The final touch was a small fresnel with a custom built softbox below the lens, also on a dimmer to blend it seamlessly.

The objective here is to avoid any hard shadows on the face, which usually means a soft source. Some people use big ringlights of large sheets of foam core with a hole for the lens to peek through, just to get that soft frontal light from above and below.

Some faces need more "direction" to the key though. I've lit one woman a couple times who has the most stunningly gorgeous cheekbones, yet when you give her frontal lighting the cheekbones disappear and she looks plain. A face like that needs more toppy light, with strategic fill for the eyes instead.

Russell Carpenter spoke about lighting women's faces in the article about "Monster in Law" in American Cinematographer recently.
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Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

CineLab

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera