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What are the current issues with using HDV?


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#1 Morgan Peline

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Posted 01 September 2005 - 06:59 PM

Hi,

I know that this has probably been asked already but I can't find the answer in the forum.

The new Sony HDV cameras come up a lot in discussions at the moment but I don't understand what the problems/issues) are at present.

- In the back of my mind I have picked up some notion that you can't yet use HDV properly yet because of a lack of post-production facilities...or something to that effect...

- and also that you need a HD monitor to watch your footage back properly (as opposed to downconverted to DVCam) does this mean that you have to transfer HDV to digiBeta or some other more common format before you can 'see' the quality of HDV?

Question: Can you or can't you use these cameras effectively in HDV mode yet or not?

Could someone please explain it simply it for me?

Thank you very much!
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#2 Luke Prendergast

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 03:01 AM

I know that this has probably been asked already but...


At least 8 times. :D
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#3 Morgan Peline

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 05:17 AM

Oops! :)

Sorry guys I can't seem to find the delete button - this must be 'problems with technology week'!
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#4 Thomas Tiller

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Posted 07 September 2005 - 02:41 AM

Hi,

I know that this has probably been asked already but I can't find the answer in the forum.

The new Sony HDV cameras come up a lot in discussions at the moment but I don't understand what the problems/issues) are at present.

- In the back of my mind I have picked up some notion that you can't yet use HDV properly yet because of a lack of post-production facilities...or something to that effect...

- and also that you need a HD monitor to watch your footage back properly (as opposed to downconverted to DVCam) does this mean that you have to transfer HDV to digiBeta or some other more common format before you can 'see' the quality of HDV?     

Question: Can you or can't you use these cameras effectively in HDV mode yet or not?

Could someone please explain it simply it for me?

Thank you very much!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>




A proper HD monitor is VERY important when shooting, these are not cheap but they are very essential. If I am not mistaken, 2008 is the year when HD should be standard, so after that transfer will not be needed. Its hardly needed today.. When it comes to movies, the distributors are working pretty good on placing HD projectors in all cinemas. This means that you will no longer need to transfer HD to 35 mm, but rather the opposite way!


My guess is; in 5-6 years, 80% of all features made are shot on digital:) Film is dying!
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#5 Tenolian Bell

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Posted 07 September 2005 - 04:50 PM

My guess is; in 5-6 years, 80% of all features made are shot on digital:) Film is dying!

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


The same thing was said 5-6 years ago.
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#6 Thomas Tiller

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 12:34 AM

The same thing was said 5-6 years ago.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Yupp! but then my guess would be 10-12 years:) lol
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#7 Tenolian Bell

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 12:56 AM

So we're not kidding aroung this time.

5-6 years and that it for film.

For real this time.
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#8 Stephen Williams

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 02:13 AM

So we're not kidding aroung this time.

5-6 years and that it for film.

For real this time.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Hi,

At present IMHO its only the Viper, in film stream mode that comes close to film quality. I think film could be around for a long time. People have said film will be dead in 5 years for the past 25 years. They were right for television news!
In numbers of films made, then possibly 80% of films are allready shot on video!

Stephen
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#9 Kyuss

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 02:15 AM

Hi,

At present IMHO its only the Viper, in film stream mode that comes close to film quality. I think film could be around for a long time. People have said film will be dead in 5 years for the past 25 years. They were right for television news!
In numbers of films made, then possibly 80% of films are allready shot on video!

Stephen

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Agreed, being that porn is so much of the film output and it is so video oriented, you could say that film is dead apart from the very specialised Hollywood and Music Video areas - Just the highest profile outputs.

IMO film will be around for ever (basically) because of the aesthetic of it. Video can come close to emulating film but has never really hit it yet.

It is likely to be like vinyl to my mind because although TECHNICALLY, CD audio and DVD audio is of finer quality (higher fidelity, more durable, greater duration of audio per disc, and importantly more channels per disc in the case of DVD audio) there is still the aesthetic of holding 12 inches of plastic in your hand. I can not go past the pleasure of holding the huge cover art work, being the owner of one of only 1000 of these items in the world, and technically of the possible wholly analogue production process removing the lack of fluidity present (though debatably imperceptible) in having 44100 interruptions to the music per second.

I can see a parallel where all other applications of short and feature length presentations become technically superior to film, but to many never quite capable of capturing the "feel" of traditional 35mm - hence a specialist or cult market resulting from a shrinking global demand for film (but importantly never a disappearance of it).

In a way, despite that I can never see myself using film, I hope like vinyl it doesn't disappear entirely.

Kyuss
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#10 Uwe Pfizenmaier

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 04:11 PM

"Film Is Dead!" was a banner headline on page one of Daily Variety in 1956 when videotape was invented!

Funny that it´s still around, ain´t it... ;)

All best! - Uwe

P.S. 5-6 more years till video cams reach film quality levels. 15-20 years (or even more) later, till digital cinema will be standard (or do you really think, a local movie theatre e.g. in Vladiwostok will be able to afford digital projection next year?)! :blink:
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Visual Products

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