Jump to content


Photo

daylight or tungsten?


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 Ian Vatcher

Ian Vatcher

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Other
  • NL, Canada

Posted 02 September 2005 - 05:58 AM

Hey guys, I'm new to this site, and I think it's really great.

Here's my situation. I'm going to shoot a test roll soon on a camera that I have recently fixed up. Reg test, etc. I was also going to shoot a few other things on the roll just to see how they would come out. A few CU's/ Some shutter angle experiments.

My question is this, I have the oppoutunity to shoot on either a tungsten/ or daylight stock. Both kodak. I don't have access to an 85 filter, and have only a few tungsten lights kicking around. I was planning on getting some exterior and interior shots. Do I shoot Daylight/ and get some good EXTs ( using some cards for fill etc.) and colour correct for the interior shots that will have tungsten lighting? Or do I shoot it all Tungsten and then colour correct the EXTs.

I may have access to some CTB gel for the lights.

I guess it's left up to a matter of choice, just wondering if anyone found one process to be more satisfying.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, Thanks in advance.
  • 0

#2 Ian Vatcher

Ian Vatcher

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Other
  • NL, Canada

Posted 02 September 2005 - 06:09 AM

I hope I put this in the right section.

I forgot to mention that the tungsten lights I will be using are 1k redheads.
  • 0

#3 John Pytlak RIP

John Pytlak RIP

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 3499 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Rochester, NY 14650-1922

Posted 02 September 2005 - 09:15 AM

Hey guys, I'm new to this site, and I think it's really great.

Here's my situation. I'm going to shoot a test roll soon on a camera that I have recently fixed up. Reg test, etc. I was also going to shoot a few other things on the roll just to see how they would come out. A few CU's/ Some shutter angle experiments.

My question is this, I have the oppoutunity to shoot on either a tungsten/ or daylight stock. Both kodak. I don't have access to an 85 filter, and have only a few tungsten lights kicking around. I was planning on getting some exterior and interior shots. Do I shoot Daylight/ and get some good EXTs ( using some cards for fill etc.) and colour correct for the interior shots that will have tungsten lighting? Or do I shoot it all Tungsten and then colour correct the EXTs.

I may have access to some CTB gel for the lights.

I guess it's left up to a matter of choice, just wondering if anyone found one process to be more satisfying.

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated, Thanks in advance.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Outdoors, you should match your lighting to the daylight (the CTB lighting filters or reflected fill) and use a daylight balance film, or a tungsten balance film with an Wratten No. 85 filter (an investment you will use again many times).

Indoors, use a tungsten balance film with tungsten lighting.

If you match the lighting to the film balance, the films will intercut well and easily be matched during the grading process.

Kodak filters:

http://www.kodak.com...=0.1.4.28&lc=en
  • 0

#4 Oli Soravia

Oli Soravia
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 51 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Europe

Posted 02 September 2005 - 10:51 AM

I'm going to shoot a test roll soon on a camera that I have recently fixed up. Reg test, etc. I was also going to shoot a few other things on the roll just to see how they would come out.

Hi Ian,

for daylight scenes - as an additional alternative - you could also use daylight (46) stock for outdoor and indoor shooting. It depends always on the look you`re going to look for. You could use the 46 inside and work with uncorrected redheads, which results in some warmer (sunlighting) look, and maybe corresponds with the sun outside. Some hard silver reflector card set outside and faced inside will provide enough daylight fill inside. Shooting uncorrected and timing it later results in colored shadows (red or blue) and increased contrast - sure, it depends always on the way you prefer. Best wishes,
OLI
  • 0

#5 John Pytlak RIP

John Pytlak RIP

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 3499 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Rochester, NY 14650-1922

Posted 02 September 2005 - 11:26 AM

Unless you really are going for a distinctly different look, its usually best to match the balance of the film (daylight or tungsten).

Kodak does have a new film and system that gives additional flexibility in post production:

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.4.4.4&lc=en

A unique film you can shoot like any other.
The KODAK VISION2 HD Color Scan Film 7299 is not a printable film. Though similar to other color negative films, it's strictly for scanning with a characterized telecine and viewing on a characterized monitor?and must be used with the KODAK VISION2 HD Digital Processor.

You?ll find that 7299 can be shot like any other stock, with some characteristics, such as shadow detail, that can be optimized by varying the rated exposure. And, because digital processing can make necessary compensations, this tungsten film can be shot outdoors without on-camera filtration.


  • 0

#6 Ian Vatcher

Ian Vatcher

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Other
  • NL, Canada

Posted 02 September 2005 - 11:36 AM

thanks guys for the reply.

Oli - Yes I think I'm leaning towards the daylight stock as I will only be shooting one roll for now. And I can use alot of available light on the EXTs and still punch in with some reflectors from the outside for the interiors. and shoot uncorrected with the redheads
John - The 7299 sounds interesting with the ability to shoot a tungsten balanced film outdoors without filtration.

Edited by Ian Vatcher, 02 September 2005 - 11:42 AM.

  • 0

#7 John Pytlak RIP

John Pytlak RIP

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 3499 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Rochester, NY 14650-1922

Posted 02 September 2005 - 11:43 AM

John - The 7299 sounds interesting with the ability to shoot a tungsten balanced film outdoors without filtration.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


We're finding 7299 is popular with those shooting television documentaries, where the lighting may be changing and unpredictable.
  • 0

#8 Ian Vatcher

Ian Vatcher

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Other
  • NL, Canada

Posted 02 September 2005 - 11:51 AM

We're finding 7299 is popular with those shooting television documentaries, where the lighting may be changing and unpredictable.


Yah I could see why, that would be quite useful.

As for shooting daylight. I believe i'll put some ctb on the redheads aswell. The less colour correction problems I have in the end the better.

Edited by Ian Vatcher, 02 September 2005 - 11:52 AM.

  • 0

#9 Dimitrios Koukas

Dimitrios Koukas
  • Sustaining Members
  • 569 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Athens, Greece, London UK

Posted 14 September 2005 - 09:41 AM

Yah I could see why, that would be quite useful.

As for shooting daylight. I believe i'll put some ctb on the redheads aswell. The less colour correction problems I have in the end the better.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


U will loose too much light with the CTB on the redheads.
Dimitrios Koukas
  • 0


FJS International, LLC

Technodolly

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

CineTape

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

The Slider

Abel Cine

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies