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Emulsion in or out


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#1 Andrea Serafino

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 11:14 AM

Hi,
I've bought some short ends to test. I'm guessing if they're emulsion in or out, how can i verify that? Usually are they emulsion in?
Thanks
Andrea
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 11:35 AM

Hi,
I've bought some short ends to test. I'm guessing if they're emulsion in or out, how can i verify that? Usually are they emulsion in?
Thanks
Andrea

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


The surest way is to snip off a short length from the end of the roll (in a darkroom or changing bag, of course), and then examine it in lighted conditions. The base side of color negative has a black rem-jet antihalation coating. The emulsion side of a color negative film is usually tan or beige in color.

If the film has been rewound, you may need to have a clip processed to verify the orientation is correct, so that the KEYKODE will be on the correct side and increment in the right direction. Otherwise, the KEYKODE may not be machine readable. Processing a clip will also verify the film type, and can be used to check fog levels (due to old age or improper storage).

http://www.kodak.com...ode/index.jhtml

http://www.kodak.com...10.10.4.4&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...10.10.4.8&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.11.18&lc=en (Package ID)

Short ends may save some money, but you do have some additional things that need attention.
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#3 Andrea Serafino

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Posted 05 September 2005 - 04:36 AM

Thank you a lot John!
I've checked it. thanks for the links too.
Andrea


The surest way is to snip off a short length from the end of the roll (in a darkroom or changing bag, of course), and then examine it in lighted conditions.  The base side of color negative has a black rem-jet antihalation coating.  The emulsion side of a color negative film is usually tan or beige in color.

If the film has been rewound, you may need to have a clip processed to verify the orientation is correct, so that the KEYKODE will be on the correct side and increment in the right direction.  Otherwise, the KEYKODE may not be machine readable.  Processing a clip will also verify the film type, and can be used to check fog levels (due to old age or improper storage).

http://www.kodak.com...ode/index.jhtml

http://www.kodak.com...10.10.4.4&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...10.10.4.8&lc=en

http://www.kodak.com...1.4.11.18&lc=en (Package ID)

Short ends may save some money, but you do have some additional things that need attention.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

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The Slider

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Technodolly