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imovie to film transfer (tarnation)


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#1 Grainy

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 04:08 PM

hi all -- that movie tarnation likes to talk about it's low price tag and how it was shot on imovie, but does anyone have an idea of what the transfer costs would be from an imovie finish to 35mm film? imovie has no frame resolution or any of the other higher end features of final cut pro...
thanks
Grainy
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 September 2005 - 01:32 AM

The costs of a transfer to film are based on running time and the type of machine used for the film recording (for example, an Arrilaser). It costs the same whether the original is Mini-DV or HD, etc.
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#3 Grainy

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Posted 04 September 2005 - 12:05 AM

The costs of a transfer to film are based on running time and the type of machine used for the film recording (for example, an Arrilaser).  It costs the same whether the original is Mini-DV or HD, etc.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


But I thought the whole point of FCP was that is was a high end prosumer program that could resolve 29.97 to 24 frames for film, as opposed to imovie and most other programs that are intended for video in/video out only. Or is that only an issue if you're going from a film original?
thanks!
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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 04 September 2005 - 07:50 AM

Hi,

I don't understand the question. If you gave a filmout facility a normal NTSC 60i tape then you might incur additional fees as they'd have to somehow resolve it down to 24p, which is complicated to do well. However, while you'll always incur some kind of setup fee regardless of the format you supply, this will pale in comparison to the cost of the filmout itself.

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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 04 September 2005 - 01:54 PM

Sure, it's a great advantage to be able to edit on a computer in frame-accurate 24 fps, mainly for material shot at 24 fps (film or 24P video). Especially if you plan on going back and conforming the original film negative to your EDL. But there are also some quality advantages in being able to create a 24P master without pulldown, like for transfer to DVD or conversion to PAL. Again, all of this assuming you shot at 24 fps.

And of course, FCP is cheaper than a pro AVID set-up.

But it doesn't help in terms of the COSTS of a transfer of digital-to-35mm, which is based on the running time and the type of transfer machine (film recorder) used. You have to remember that simply the costs of the 35mm intermediate stock & processing alone may be nearly $10,000 for a feature-length project. A laser recorder transfer using intermediate stock may cost anywhere from $50,000 to $70,000 for a feature, and a CRT transfer to camera negative stock maybe half that, more like $30,000 to $40,000.

All of these costs are lower for shorter projects of course.
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#6 Grainy

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Posted 04 September 2005 - 04:31 PM

I see -- thanks guys!
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#7 Bill Totolo

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 04:41 PM

FYI, Grainy I shot a feature doc that I never thought would get screened anywhere so I shot it 60i on an XL-1. The Producer ended up doing a film out and I was really impressed by how good it looked. It had a nice gentle gamma curve, no objectionable artifacts. I viewed this on a 20 foot screen, nothing as big as the Pacific or the Arclight.

I think it really came down to the color timing. IMHO, of course. I tested both Arri laser and Celco fury and for my project preferred the look we got with the Arrilaser at CFI (now Technicolor).

But please consider using something other than iMovie to cut your film. At least look at Avid free DV if you can't afford to purchase an NLE:

http://www.avid.com/...v/resources.asp

Best,

Edited by Bill T., 06 September 2005 - 04:43 PM.

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#8 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 06 September 2005 - 06:57 PM

Hi,

Did your filmout look better than that video projection you disliked?

I think a lot of it's about projection.

Phil
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#9 Bill Totolo

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Posted 07 September 2005 - 11:29 AM

Oh yeah, no question, Phil. It looked remarkebly better. This was about two years ago- so it was before my bias against digital projection.

For those who are unfamiliar with my experience I had a short that screened at last years LAShorts Film Festival and the projector was an outdated model and wasn't set up properly.

That said, I have seen digital projections that blew me away like the ones at the Pacific Theater in Hollywood.
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