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Using 85 Warming filter


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#1 Brian Rose

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Posted 05 September 2005 - 09:02 AM

This may be a silly question, but, even though a film like 50D is balanced for daylight, is it true that I should still use the 85 filter, to ensure warmer, more saturated colors?
Best
BR
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#2 Chris Burke

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Posted 05 September 2005 - 10:37 AM

This may be a silly question, but, even though a film like 50D is balanced for daylight, is it true that I should still use the 85 filter, to ensure warmer, more saturated colors?
Best
BR

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>




A 85 filter is used to correct tungsten balanced film for use in daylight. It will give you a very warm orange feel to everything you shoot. Generally, this is not recommended. Try a tiffen 812 or and enhancing filter. You can also use a partial correction, like a CTO 1/4 or 1/2 or whatever your needs are. Is the film for print or telecine only? If telecine only, you can get what ever "look" you want in post. Keep in mind that 7245, assuming this is the stock you are reffering to, is a very saturated stock to begin with. Also, the quality of the light you will be shooting with, ie.. dusk, dawn, noon, cloudy, full sun has a load to do with how the film will look. My advice: test, test and test again. Good luck.


Chris

:rolleyes:
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#3 Steven Budden

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Posted 05 September 2005 - 03:23 PM

And warmer wouldn't automatically mean more saturated. A full spectrum of colors will often read as more saturated. I'd just try the film as is first and adjust from there.

Steven
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#4 Andy Sparaco SOC

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Posted 09 October 2005 - 03:11 PM

You might consider an 85C which will warm up daylight film or the 81 series of filtration which would be more subtle
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#5 Robert Glenn

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 09:25 AM

so an 85 filter is too orangy to use even for tungsten film outdoors?
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#6 Stephen Williams

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 09:49 AM

so an 85 filter is too orangy to use even for tungsten film outdoors?



Hi,

An 85 is perfect for tungsten film outdoors.

Stephen
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#7 Robert Glenn

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 10:02 PM

Hi,

An 85 is perfect for tungsten film outdoors.

Stephen

thanks stephen.
By the way.. what filters do you use the most?
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#8 Stephen Williams

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Posted 14 October 2005 - 02:50 AM

thanks stephen.
By the way.. what filters do you use the most?


Hi,

85, 81EF, ND.3, ND.6, ND.9, ND1.2, Pol. in the kit for every job, then Promist, Grads, Enhansers, Ultra con etc as required.

Stephen
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#9 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 14 October 2005 - 03:27 AM

This may be a silly question, but, even though a film like 50D is balanced for daylight, is it true that I should still use the 85 filter, to ensure warmer, more saturated colors?
Best
BR

actually,
When u re using a daylight stock, the result will be almost the same as u look thru any coloured filter thru a naked eye, but not more than 3 seconds, u see the human eye has an ''auto colour correction'' installed from mother nature :) and it will try to compensate and balance the difference.
Dimitrios Koukas
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#10 Robert Glenn

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Posted 23 October 2005 - 02:58 PM

actually,
When u re using a daylight stock, the result will be almost the same as u look thru any coloured filter thru a naked eye, but not more than 3 seconds, u see the human eye has an ''auto colour correction'' installed from mother nature :) and it will try to compensate and balance the difference.
Dimitrios Koukas

thx for the help. I have another question! Is there any particular order that filters should be in? I hear that ND filters should be in order from lightest to most dense, although that could be untrue. But for using color correction, UV and polorizers and ND as well.. does it matter?
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#11 Chris Keth

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Posted 23 October 2005 - 03:14 PM

You might consider an 85C which will warm up daylight film or the 81 series of filtration which would be more subtle



This would be the best way to go, or correct it in transfer. An 85 is REALLY orange if you're already using the correct film for the lighting conditions.

thx for the help. I have another question! Is there any particular order that filters should be in? I hear that ND filters should be in order from lightest to most dense, although that could be untrue. But for using color correction, UV and polorizers and ND as well.. does it matter?



I haven't heard a rule for those types of filters. I DO know that diffusion filters (promist, soft FX, etc) should be the most forward in the mattebox stages as possible, since they generally rely on ambient light falling on the filter itself.
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#12 Will Montgomery

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Posted 23 October 2005 - 03:23 PM

Try a tiffen 812 or and enhancing filter.


I had the opportunity to pick up an "enhancing filter" for my K-3... what exactly does it do? If seems to saturate the colors a little more but I'm not sure how or if its worth having in my arsenal.
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#13 Robert Glenn

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Posted 23 October 2005 - 03:49 PM

This would be the best way to go, or correct it in transfer. An 85 is REALLY orange if you're already using the correct film for the lighting conditions.
I haven't heard a rule for those types of filters. I DO know that diffusion filters (promist, soft FX, etc) should be the most forward in the mattebox stages as possible, since they generally rely on ambient light falling on the filter itself.

Yeah it probably was the the mist filters now that you mention it.
BTW a sky-1a filter is another alternative.. It's a light pink color
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#14 Luke Prendergast

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Posted 23 October 2005 - 04:46 PM

...know that diffusion filters (promist, soft FX, etc) should be the most forward in the mattebox stages as possible, since they generally rely on ambient light falling on the filter itself.


It can be necessary to keep the 'optically imperfect' filters like diffusion as close to the lens as possible to keep the filter far enough out of focus. The grid of an almost-there net looks pretty stupid, even if it is an arty music video. If you want your diffusion to be halated highlights without lifting the shadows then I'd be keeping the filter well shielded from ambient light.
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#15 Glenn Hanns

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Posted 23 October 2005 - 05:26 PM

This may be a silly question, but, even though a film like 50D is balanced for daylight, is it true that I should still use the 85 filter, to ensure warmer, more saturated colors?
Best
BR


I tend to ask for the 85B not the Wratten 85 as the B gets you 3,200 not 3,400 like the straight 85. Does anyone else have a preference?
Cheers, Glenn.
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#16 Robert Glenn

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Posted 23 October 2005 - 06:12 PM

I tend to ask for the 85B not the Wratten 85 as the B gets you 3,200 not 3,400 like the straight 85. Does anyone else have a preference?
Cheers, Glenn.

Kodak just says 85 for 5500k shooting on 3200k tungsten on their vision stock pages. I guess either one will work well, with the 85 being a little cooler, obviously!

http://www.kodak.com...00t/index.shtml
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#17 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 24 October 2005 - 01:03 AM

This would be the best way to go, or correct it in transfer. An 85 is REALLY orange if you're already using the correct film for the lighting conditions.
I haven't heard a rule for those types of filters. I DO know that diffusion filters (promist, soft FX, etc) should be the most forward in the mattebox stages as possible, since they generally rely on ambient light falling on the filter itself.


Hello,
I always trying to avoid putting pro-mists and soft-fx filters further away from the lens!
You see if light falls on to the filter the diffusion looses it's grade number and it's very easy to get an overall fogue in your image!
Maybe i am wrong here, but by my experience, a pro-mist filter that is graded 1/4 can work as an /12 if you move it away from the lens!
Also any light that might fall onto it will fogue the whole frame!
I am using them closest to the lens possible and with mattebox masks same to the lens I am using on the box.
Just because of their natural characteristics, they will absorb and diffuse any light that falls on them.
Dimitrios Koukas
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