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What do i need to do????


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#1 Wes Shaye

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Posted 07 September 2005 - 11:02 PM

Hi,

Ive been a movie fan my whole life. Ive recently became interested in cameras and Id like to get one in the future. I look on this website or in certain magazines and i understand some stuff, from what ive picked up on over the years, but other stuff i dont. Im looking for advice for where a total beginner would start.

Im talking books or websites that explain what the difference between 35mm and 8mm or Super 16. How is film developed, what can and cant you do with it, different kinds of film stock, digital filmmaking etc. you get the picture.

Im looking for the basics, but in detail. Can anyone point me to some good books or anything? Id appreciate it alot. ................. Thanks
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#2 Sam Javor

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 08:44 PM

Im looking for the basics, but in detail.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I can only suggest google... if you don't understanding a topic google it... then google everything in each article you don't understand...especially acronyms... and maybe pick up a cheap camera (and I mean really cheap) to screw around with for a bit to apply some of the knowledge and to find new questions to ask... if you want to stick to film then you can get a 35mm still camera for next to nothing now and the basics still apply.

I should also add that you need to read multiple article on the same topic :) Then you get a good perspective on the general concensous

Edited by zekthedeadcow, 08 September 2005 - 08:47 PM.

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#3 Delorme Jean-Marie

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Posted 09 September 2005 - 03:24 AM

if you are curious about a film set ask for a PA job on an indy short and see buy yourself.
one thing is theory another is real life out of books.
do both you'll save time and money.
ps: they always look for PA on indy film don't worry
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#4 Paul Bruening

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 01:43 PM

Hey now,

Nothing can replace direct experience. I live in a college town. I end up guru-ing for quite a few newbies in movie making. Invariably, they try their first production (always shorts) and run into most of the hassles and pitfalls I warn them about. But, they do learn.

If your goal is to learn movie making at the high end, sign on with a big feature at any level they'll let you in on. For an indie production, they always need free help. Just being there wil open your eyes. If you want to make your own stuff, start with the cheapest DV cam with a mic input that you can get. Write shorts scripts and get shooting. If you just want to cut your teeth on film, then a 16mm Bell and Howell winder, rolling reversal stock, will get you where you want to go.

Movie making is still a secret craft, even with all the books available. The knowing is in the doing.
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#5 timHealy

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Posted 11 September 2005 - 04:28 PM

I agree that a google searches can be a great way to start. But also try and get a copy of the ASC manual. It has a lot of good basic film camera and processing info in it. You could actually get an old copy and much of the material will be the same. As far as the video and HD part of the business, technology changes so fast I have trouble keeping up. Personally most of my work is film, but as soon as I get more video work, I'll understand more as I get the cameras and equipment in my hands.

And do some searches on this site. There is a lot of good info here as some of the other websites like cinematography.net and cinematographer.com (sorry Tim).

And by all means get a cheap super 8 or 16mm camera and start shooting. Like some others have said there is nothing like experience.

Best

Tim
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Visual Products

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Paralinx LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Opal

Technodolly

Wooden Camera