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S16 to 35


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#1 Lucita Jones

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 10:25 AM

Hi,

I understand that blowing up from S16mm to 35mm will increase grain, but will it also increase color saturation? I want to obtain a fine grain, color saturated print. This is the stock that I am thinking of using. I'd appreciate learning from your advise and suggestions...especially regarding the rating of the film.

- EXT day, springtime, with that awful haze typical of air-polluted cities:

EXR 50 with polarizer (for saturation and bluer skies) rated at ISO 12
(overexposed 2/3 for brighter color, compensated 1 1/3 for pola)
Should I use a filter to beat that ugly haze?

- INT day with windows in shot. Lit with kinoflow and ambient light that will hopefully reach 250 fc. Might also use color corrected tungsten 2K for raising ambient light
7246 rated at 160


- INT night. Lit with tungsten with key lights of about 200 fc
7277 rated at 200


Am I going about it correctly? This is my first S16mm film where I do the lighting....I will be posting many questions in these days, I appreciate your help
THANKS
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#2 jeremy edge

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 10:55 AM

People seem to concur that the finest grain stocks are 7245,7212,7217,7205,7218
in pretty close to that order.The vision 2 stocks ,along with the 50d exr are thhe finest grain.

- INT night. Lit with tungsten with key lights of about 200 fc
7277 rated at 200
Am I going about it correctly? This is my first S16mm film where I do the lighting....I will be posting many questions in these days, I appreciate your help
THANKS

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

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#3 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 11:03 AM

I would add:

use the slowest film stock that will do the job. A lot of potential sharpness is lost due to excessive ND filters, lens stopped down too far, combination filter packs, etc.

Some people try to shoot everything on one stock (usually 7218) and they end up with very nice and sharp interior night shots (no ND filters, wide open lens, etc) and muddy sunlit exteriors (plenty of filters, lens stopped down too far).

You cannot believe what difference in sharpness the same lens and the same film stock can make when used in improper conditions.
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#4 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 08 September 2005 - 12:05 PM

I concur with Dirk: in general, for optimum image quality, use the slowest film stock the light allows. If you have enough light, let depth of field determine the f/stop you use, remembering that although f/16 has lots of depth of field, it is usually not as sharp as a middle stop (due to diffraction limiting).
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