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one year course / steadicam course


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#1 Bernie

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 12:06 PM

Hi

I have attended a four years course at a Swiss film school, learning the basics of all filmmaking jobs. I would like to deepen my knowledge in photography, film as well as video. I have shot on Arri, Aaton, Eclair, Bolex, Super8, DV, Beta SP, but only about one film per camera, and I don't feel really confident when dop-ing (lack of experience, I guess).
Is there a good school offering one year courses? Or any shorter workshops recommended?
You might say: just learn by doing, but it seems to me that a film school provides new contacts and therefore more opportunities to actually "be doing", no?
Or shall I find an experienced DP who'll take me as an intern/assistant?

Another question: How does one become a steadicam operator? Where can you get training?
I am geographically flexible.

And then one least: are there any standard books you would recommend (film cameras, video cameras, lighting)?

Thanks for any hints
Bernie
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#2 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 04:50 PM

The cinematography workshops in Rockpot, Maine are considered by most to be pretty good. I've never attended one, but I've always heard good things from people who have. I think they have very short and very long courses depending on what you want.

Steadicam workshops are held throughout the country and the world. The best workshops are held through the SOA (Steadicam Operator's Association), but there are other workshops through other companies as well. I believe there is one in Rockport and PRO does a workshop now and then, but not as often as the SOA.
Most of the workshops are a week long. The one I attended was in PA near Philly. There is another big one in Malibu, CA every year.
Check http://www.steadicam-ops.com/ for more details. It looks like they have workshops scheduled in Paris, PA, Chile, Stockholm, and Melbourne right now, so you have lots of choices.

I should mention that a week long course will not MAKE you a steadicam operator. Most operators spend many months, and even years, training before they actually start to look for work. But a workshop is a good way to find out whether steadicam is right for you. Some people find that it's not for them, and for others a workshop is a good way to learn basic techniques and begin training for a career. Also, it's important to be a good conventional operator before getting into steadicam. Being able to carry the weight and keep a level horizon are just the basics, actually keeping a nice frame throughout a long move is where true skill and artistry is really needed. There are many steadicam operators that get into it with very little knowledge or skill in conventional operating, and it hurts their careers considerably.

Sorry to be so long winded. I hope this info helps.

Edited by grimmett, 12 September 2005 - 05:00 PM.

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#3 Bernie

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Posted 14 September 2005 - 03:39 AM

"Sorry to be so long winded. I hope this info helps."


Thank you for the detailed answer!
Bernie
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The Slider

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Glidecam

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CineLab

Visual Products

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc