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I have no 85 filter


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#1 uoliwils

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 12:11 PM

hello,
I wanted to try some e64t with my still camera but I have no 85 filter for it. I'm going to shoot in daylight but I don't want to buy a filter since I never use tungsten film in still photography. I'm doing it because I'd like to see how it looks cross-processed (c41) and try it on s8 e64t later.

I realized that maybe one of my ilford multigrade filters (b&w darkroom) could do. Any advice on wich one to choose? 00 or 0 perhaps?

And, most important, how does ektachrome 64t still 35mm compare to the super8 version? Are they the same thing?
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 07:22 PM

hello,
I wanted to try some e64t with my still camera but I have no 85 filter for it. I'm going to shoot in daylight but I don't want to buy a filter since I never use tungsten film in still photography. I'm doing it because I'd like to see how it looks cross-processed (c41) and try it on s8 e64t later.

I realized that maybe one of my ilford multigrade filters (b&w darkroom) could do. Any advice on wich one to choose? 00 or 0 perhaps?

And, most important, how does ektachrome 64t still 35mm compare to the super8 version? Are they the same thing?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


If you are really trying to judge color reproduction and tone scale, use the correct filtration. Can't you borrow the correct filter?
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 07:51 PM

Screw-on filters for a still camera are like 10 bucks...

With color reversal, it is more important to at least get CLOSE to the correct balance -- shooting 3200K film unfiltered in 5500K light will result in a fairly blue-ish image that will not correct easily because of the lack of red information in fleshtones.
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#4 uoliwils

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Posted 12 September 2005 - 11:51 PM

thanks for the replies!
yeah, you're both right.
unfortunately I'm shooting it with a leica rf, and filters for this one aren't that cheap. They're not readily available also (at least where I live).

I though that since I'm cross-processing it, the results will be quite unpredictable anyway, so I was just trying to get close to a 85 filter effect, only to have a vague idea on what it looks like.

david
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#5 Marty Hamrick

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 08:16 AM

thanks for the replies!
yeah, you're both right.
unfortunately I'm shooting it with a leica rf, and filters for this one aren't that cheap. They're not readily available also (at least where I live).

I though that since I'm cross-processing it, the results will be quite unpredictable anyway, so I was just trying to get close to a 85 filter effect, only to have a vague idea on what it looks like.

david

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An 85 filter is orange.I got stuck once without one and happened to have some blank processed 2 and a quarter color negatives.They were just the right size to tape over the lens hood.It worked for what I was shooting at the time.
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#6 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 09:35 AM

An 85 filter is orange.I got stuck once without one and happened to have some blank processed 2 and a quarter color negatives.They were just the right size to tape over the lens hood.It worked for what I was shooting at the time.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Interesting. Would be interesting to compare the orange-colored D-min (minimum density) of a color negative (e.g., 5245) with the spectral characteristics of a Wratten 85 filter:

Posted Image

Posted Image

Somewhat similar, but different. More like an 85N3, so you need to increase exposure by an additional stop. Likely an improvement over shooting tungsten balance film in daylight without any filter.
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#7 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 01:00 PM

I'm going to shoot in daylight but I don't want to buy a filter since I never use tungsten film in still photography.


I got a few 85B & 85 filters at a second hand camera store for about $6 each. My pictures aren't blue and there is still food in my fridge.
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#8 uoliwils

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 01:56 PM

Skratch wrote:

I got a few 85B & 85 filters at a second hand camera store for about $6 each. My pictures aren't blue and there is still food in my fridge.


Yes... And then I said that I couldn't find it anyway because of the odd thread on my lens (summicron40/2 has not a proper E39 filter thread - different pitch, hard to find and there are no good photography shops in the surroundinds)

David wrote:

They're not readily available also (at least where I live).



My question was really simple: is a 0 or 00 ilford multigrade similar to a 85 filter? If so it would be easy to tape it in front of lens and obtain acceptable results. That's what I did in the end and pics look fine.

david
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#9 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 02:57 PM

Skratch wrote:
Yes... And then I said that I couldn't find it anyway because of the odd thread on my lens (summicron40/2 has not a proper E39 filter thread - different pitch, hard to find and there are no good photography shops in the surroundinds)

David wrote:
My question was really simple: is a 0 or 00 ilford multigrade similar to a 85 filter? If so it would be easy to tape it in front of lens and obtain acceptable results. That's what I did in the end and pics look fine.

david

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Do you have a filter holder for your camera that allows the use of a square gelatin filter?
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#10 uoliwils

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Posted 13 September 2005 - 03:21 PM

John Pytlak wrote:

Do you have a filter holder for your camera that allows the use of a square gelatin filter?


I'd like to, but I'm not sure it even exists for that lens. This time I just taped the gelatin filter in front of it.

I know it's not the right filter, and I don't understimate the importance of using the right one. Simply, I believe results in cross-processing are so unpredictable that using the right filter becomes a bit less important than usual.

I'm really pleased with the colors I got, it's exactly what I was looking for and I'd like to try it on E64T super8 soon.

david
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