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#1 Ram Shani

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Posted 14 September 2005 - 08:39 AM

hi

how many of you use photoshop or any ather program for pre viz ?

any one here use the kodak look maneger??

is it good for pre viz video for AFTER EFFECT , FLAME, AVID SIMPHONY???

RAM

Edited by ramdop, 14 September 2005 - 08:42 AM.

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#2 Michael Nash

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Posted 14 September 2005 - 04:30 PM

Photoshop is a great tool for manipulating an image and trying out ideas, but on its own it doesn't directly correspond to the manipulations you can do in post. In other words, you can use it to approximate or simulate effects that you create with the other post tools you mentioned, but there's nothing to translate the data directly from one program to another (as far as I know). Ron Garcia, ASC, developed a system based on Photoshop that lets DP's do basic color correction and send the info to telecine colorists using images and calibration profiles, but I don't know that much about it.

Tools like Kodak's Look Manager are designed to accurately track changes across systems (digital camera to color corrected print, for example).

If you know what can be done in post, then it's not hard to simulate those tools in Photoshop to try out ideas. I regularly use the curves tool in RGB colorspace to try out ideas that I might do with film or video, but only as a rough guide.
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#3 Jaan Shenberger

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Posted 14 September 2005 - 11:46 PM

depending on your colorist and the telecine's cc toolset, it could potentially be helpful and save time. i would suggest though, that you have both "before" and "after" images of the image, as well as screengrabs of any settings/manipulations you do, such as curves, HSL and color balance. though these won't directly translate to whatever cc tools the colorist is using, it'll give an aesthetic & technical reference for what you're hoping for. but again, this will largely depend on the individual colorist. i tried this once and all it resulted in was me very quickly realizing that my colorist and/or the cc tools were considerably under par.

hope this helps,
jaan
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#4 Ram Shani

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 12:37 AM

hi

michael and jaan thanks for the answers .

WHERE I CAN FIND MORE INFO ABOUT RON GARCIA ASC SYSTEM??

is kodak KLM is good for digital cam to video online systems like affter and flame?

ram
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#5 Michael Nash

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Posted 17 September 2005 - 04:58 PM

WHERE I CAN FIND MORE INFO ABOUT RON GARCIA ASC SYSTEM??

is kodak KLM is good for digital cam to video online systems like after and flame?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


There was an article about Garcia's system in American Cinematographer several years back, although I have no idea what issue. Late 90's. I talked to him about it once at an ASC open house, and he stressed that it was based on simple Photoshop techniques but also included monitor profiles so that the colorist was looking at the same image as the DP. Short of that, before-and-after prints or JPEGS are the next best thing as a visual reference.

As I understand it, the Kodak Look Manager system is designed to pre-vis the end result of standard photochemical processes.

But I'm not sure why you're asking about AfterEffects or Flame, since those tools can do SO much and are so complex that it's kind of hard to translate everything they can do into another program.

Unless I'm misunderstanding your question, it seems like you're going about this backwards -- you're asking, "can I use Photoshop to see how my image will look after I post it in Flame or AfterEffects?", without knowing what you're going to do with the image in those tools. Normally you would have a finished look in mind, possibly created in Photoshop, and then you would ask, "can I create this look in After Effects or Flame?"

Either way, you really have to become familiar with what each post tool is capable of, and then try to limit your manipulations to those tools. For example I can use Photoshop to emulate what I can do with traditional lab color timing, but I have to limit my tools to very basic levels and curves, taking into account the way the film layers respond to different exposure. Otherwise it's easy to create a look that exceeds what's possible with traditional lab tools. Same thing with AfterEffects, Flame, or any other tool set. You have to know what those systems can do and how they work if you're planning on using them.
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#6 Ram Shani

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 03:21 AM

hi

michael thanks for the answer.

you answer my quation

i planing to use photoshop for guide when i tallk to a director to give him idea of what i'm affter for in the shooting and as same kind of guide for the on line

ram

Edited by ramdop, 18 September 2005 - 03:22 AM.

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