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Buying a major light kit. Need recommendations.


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#1 Kyle Fasanella

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Posted 14 September 2005 - 08:16 PM

Buying a major light kit. Need recommendations.

Hey guys I am looking for a continuous light kit for shooting video of models and independent filmmaking. I have 2k to spend more if the money is worth it. I want at least a 3 point lighting with key, omni, tota. I also want stands that are very stable for film people traveling between the stands all the time.

Also important for me is a dimmer for small locations. what grips can do this?

I am considering

http://www.bhphotovi...oughType=search

what else would I need to buy if this is my first light kit. and why.

Any recommendations?
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#2 oscar jimenez

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 10:25 AM

Maybe Mole Richardson 2k fresnel kit can do or Arrilite 2k kit. Conversion gels and Small Chimeras for heads.
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#3 Tim Tyler

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 10:40 AM

Buying a major light kit.

No offense, but $2k is not 'major'.

There are many threads in this forum that discuss low cost 'starter' light kits. Please have a look around.
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#4 oscar jimenez

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 12:51 PM

and for 2k or under: Lowell DP 1k junior ( 3 heads + stands + umbrellas + gels )
I guess it was around $1,500.00 at BH Photo Video.
Good luck.
**spare bulbs are not expensive, lists $15.00 each. Lamps are sturdy and very durable, I have one kit that is around 10 years old and still does the job.
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#5 Paul Bruening

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 09:50 PM

Hey now,

If you want the most bang for your buck, theater cans with 1K or 1/2K PARS deliver pretty well. They're not as vesatile as other units made specifically for movie work but they deliver the highest volume of light for the least bucks. As well, you can put dichroic bulbs in them for near-daylight kelvins at around $150.00 a bulb.

I got my cans from Dr. Bob's for about $30.00 each. The tungsten Kelvin bulbs run around $40.00 each. I got the stands and doors from B&H. You have to get the fittings to make the cans match the stands.

The theater cans take some doing to get various uses out of them. Since their beam is often harsh and concentrated even with the soft PAR lens, you learn to bounce them alot. Even with their limits, they get the most watts on your subject of any tungsten fixture. Since indie productions often have to make do with wall power, the PARS can get you the stops you need. Also, they don't have the sync-flicker hassles of HMIs.

Hope that will be of some use.
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#6 Bob Hayes

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Posted 16 September 2005 - 01:47 PM

I like the Arri lights. Look into buying them used if your budget is tight. Also half of your lighting is achieved by grip equipment. You ight want to purchase some c-stands, flags, nets and sand bags.
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#7 John Thomas

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Posted 16 September 2005 - 03:16 PM

If you want the most bang for your buck, theater cans with 1K or 1/2K PARS deliver pretty well



You can do a lot of damage with 6 par cans. If you can control those beasts indoors you've earned a lighting PHD. If I was alone on a desert island I would take the par cans over any petite lighting kit.

Paul, Do you know my friend Kent Moorehead? He directed some cool stuff in Oxford, good filmmaker.

JT
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#8 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 07:40 AM

You can do a lot of damage with 6 par cans.  If you can control those beasts indoors you've earned a lighting PHD.  If I was alone on a desert island I would take the par cans over any petite lighting kit.

Paul, Do you know my friend Kent Moorehead?  He directed some cool stuff in Oxford, good filmmaker.

JT

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I agree here,
Check Behringers small sets with parcans and dimmer packs as for a console, it will get u to 2k.Not so easy to control though so u definately need flags e.t.c.
Dimitrios
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#9 Paul Bruening

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 03:43 PM

Hey John,

Heck yea, I know Kent. Kent's pretty much "da man" around here. He gave me my first PA gig on Diamond King. I was a rotten employee and he was really gracious about it. He has a cool demeanor and really knows his stuff. He put a fine docu on Meridith and civil rights in the recent Oxford Film Festival.
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#10 John Thomas

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Posted 19 September 2005 - 10:13 AM

Paul,

check PMs
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