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#1 Charles Haine

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 07:52 PM

A couple of questions about the 99:

People keep mentioning how it won't make a good print, it's only useful for telecine. Why is that? Someone in one of the threads mentioned the color mask, but I'm not sure what that is, exactly (is it an additional layer in the film? is it the balance of a film to a specific color temperature?).

Also, the website only lists the #7299, which indicates 16mm film gauge. anybody know if it will eventually be available in 35?

Lastly: will it be possible to transfer this film at any telecine house if we're willing to give up the ability to select our look from a list of existing films? If we want to build the look with the colorist from scratch from a wide latitude negative, seems like this might be a good choice (though of course that will take more time).

thanks,
chuck haine
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#2 Dominic Case

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Posted 15 September 2005 - 10:28 PM

Conventional color negatives appear pinky-orange. THis is due to integral masking. Here is how it works:

During development, yellow, magenta and cyan dyes are formed from the colour couplers in each emulsion layer, in the exposed areas. Unfortunately, these dyes are not perfect from a colorimetric viewpoint: the cyan dye is a little unsaturated (absorbs some red as well) and the magenta is a little too yellow (absorbs some blue).

In print film, the couplers (which are really like unexposed, unprocessed dyes) are colourless. In negative film, they have managed to devise couplers that are slightly red and slightly yellow respectively when unconverted. As a result, the entire image appears a bit too red/yellow: in exposed areas it is because the dyes are imperfect, in unexposed areas it is because the couplers have that collur anyway.

As the entire image is orange-biassed, the print emulsion is balanced to compensate for that. Similarly, the telecine is also balanced up to expect an orange-biassed image from conventional colour negative.

However, in telecine, it is also possible to comensate for the unwanted absorbtions of the negative dye layers electronically. So the '99 emulsion relies on that by minimising the orange mask (ie by using colourless couplers in the negative emulsion itself.) This apprently gives the manufacturer more leeway to concentrate on a faster, finer-grained, shartper emulsion, by leaving all the fine-tuning of the colour to the digital stages of telecine.

But if you attempted to print from '99 (a) you would get poor reproduction of colour and (B) the lack of orange in the neg would push the printer lights way off centre in trying to get a neutral balance.

Note that the colour mask is NOT a separate layer, nor is it the colour of the base. It is integral in the emulsion layers.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 16 September 2005 - 09:08 AM

Kodak VISION2 HD Color Scan Film 7299 DOES use colored coupler masking:

http://www.kodak.com...e/H-1-7299t.pdf

But its lower contrast, longer latitude characteristic was optimized for scanning and telecine transfer, with customized LUT and color management technology in the KODAK VISION2 HD Digital Processor. With the telecine set to the nominal starting conditions as recommended for the KODAK VISION2 HD System, color and tone characteristics can be automatically set to match the baseline technical starting point of any other Kodak color negative film. Once set to this starting condition, normal color correction can be applied as with any other typical motion picture negative film.
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