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"Frankenstein" USA


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#1 jeremy edge

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Posted 18 September 2005 - 10:51 PM

Just picked up a copy of this USA movie on DVD.
I have to say after reading about this film on kodak's site ,I have been wanting to see it.
http://www.kodak.com...nkenstein.jhtml

Now that I have ...all I can say is WOW!

Beautiful images and almost no grain! and all shot with mostly 7218.

If there is something out there that better shows off the small format, I have not seen it yet.

Anyone willing to speculate how they got such a sharp image in s16?

Perhaps scanning to hd afforded more control of grain removal?

If you havent seen this ,I recommend checking it out for if nothing else ,the visauls. not a bad movie either for a tv movie.
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#2 Nate Downes

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Posted 19 September 2005 - 08:27 AM

Just picked up a copy of this USA movie on DVD.
I have to say after reading about this film on kodak's site ,I have been wanting to see it.
http://www.kodak.com...nkenstein.jhtml

Now that I have ...all I can say is WOW!

Beautiful images and almost no grain! and all shot with mostly 7218.

If there is something out there that better shows off the small format, I have not seen it yet.

Anyone willing to speculate how they got such a sharp image in s16?

Perhaps scanning to hd afforded more control of grain removal?

If you havent seen this ,I recommend checking it out for if nothing else ,the visauls. not a bad movie either for a tv movie.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

With the new filmstocks, grain size has been reduced. Properly exposed, the 7218 will deliver fantastic results.

My speculation is that a) they exposed it properly and B) they used a sharp lens. That's the only secret here.

HD scanning won't "remove grain" any more than optical printing will. Every time you copy from the master, you will gain some grain/noise. I've seen optical prints from 7218 that you'd be hard pressed to see the grain as well.
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#3 jeremy edge

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Posted 19 September 2005 - 11:27 AM

[quote name='downix' date='Sep 19 2005, 09:27 AM']
With the new filmstocks, grain size has been reduced. Properly exposed, the 7218 will deliver fantastic results.

My speculation is that a) they exposed it properly and B) they used a sharp lens. That's the only secret here."

In the Kodak article it said they used 2 zooms for most of the movie.You usually hear zeiss superspeeds are used in something like this.Although the newer zooms they used are probably very very sharp.

They only reason I suggested the hd scanning might have something to do with the sharpness is because it seems like having more resolution to start with always helps.I have one 480p display in my house hooked up to a dish network reciever and I can always tell the HD channels from the sd channels even tough they are clean and the reciever is upconverting them to progressive.

Also ,wouldnt it stand to reason that for dvd release ...you would want your images scanned progressive? Wouldnt an sd transfer make interlaced scans of the film image resulting in a lesser image or do I have a misunderstanding of how that works?
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#4 Nate Downes

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Posted 19 September 2005 - 11:51 AM

With the new filmstocks, grain size has been reduced.  Properly exposed, the 7218 will deliver fantastic results. 

My speculation is that a) they exposed it properly and B) they used a sharp lens.  That's the only secret here.


In the Kodak article it said they used 2 zooms for most of the movie.You usually hear zeiss superspeeds are used in something like this.Although the newer zooms they used are probably very very sharp.

They only reason I suggested the hd scanning might have something to do with the sharpness is because it seems like having more resolution to start with always helps.I have one 480p display in my house hooked up to a dish network reciever and I can always tell the HD channels from the sd channels even tough they are clean and the reciever is upconverting them to progressive.

Also ,wouldnt it stand to reason that for dvd release ...you would want your images scanned progressive? Wouldnt an sd transfer make interlaced scans of the film image resulting in a lesser image or do I have a misunderstanding of how that works?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

All the HD scanning would do is clean up the image. Would not affect the grain structure. If you had grain the size of golfballs in the film, you'd still have it in the finished scan. All HD scanning would have done is provide the filmmakers a way to by-pass the digital-intermediate noise that often occurs in a scan. Sure, the noise would happen, but it would happen on a HD level, and thereby when you downres it, would vanish in the data which was thrown out.

Maybe you said grain when you ment digital line noise?
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#5 Stephen Williams

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Posted 20 September 2005 - 03:07 AM

Maybe you said grain when you ment digital line noise?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Hi,

Most telecine operators confuse noise and grain! I like to telecine with all the noise reduction turned off! Then you can see how well maintained the telecine is! Often it is necessary to put the noise reducer back on!

Stephen
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#6 Nate Downes

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Posted 20 September 2005 - 04:16 PM

Indeed and amen! Without those fancy digital-noise reducers, I couldn't believe anyone would find digital images passable.
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