Jump to content


Photo

"Eternal Sunshine" spotlight


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Justin Marshall

Justin Marshall

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Student

Posted 20 September 2005 - 11:19 PM

I'm working on an HD short, and the director wants the camera-mounted spotlight look Ellen Kuras did in "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind". I'm wondering what kind of light I should rig to the camera. In the film, the light is very hard and "spotty"...I doubt there was much/any diffusion. It must have also been pretty bright--they shot 500-ASA, but the faces are often pretty blown-out. In an article, Ellen Kuras said she used sodium & mercury vapor lights...I think this was just to balance temperature to streetlights, though.

Many thanks for any suggestions/leads.
Justin
  • 0

#2 Tim J Durham

Tim J Durham
  • Sustaining Members
  • 742 posts
  • Director
  • East Coast, Baby!

Posted 21 September 2005 - 12:11 AM

I'm working on an HD short, and the director wants the camera-mounted spotlight look Ellen Kuras did in "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind".  I'm wondering what kind of light I should rig to the camera.  In the film, the light is very hard and "spotty"...I doubt there was much/any diffusion.  It must have also been pretty bright--they shot 500-ASA, but the faces are often pretty blown-out.  In an article, Ellen Kuras said she used sodium & mercury vapor lights...I think this was just to balance temperature to streetlights, though. 

Many thanks for any suggestions/leads.
Justin

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I don't know what they used particularly, but every news cameraman in the world carries one of those lights in their kit. Something like an Anton-Bauer Sungun. Mounts to the spud atop the camera and is powered by an AB battery.
  • 0

#3 Dimitrios Koukas

Dimitrios Koukas
  • Sustaining Members
  • 569 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Athens, Greece, London UK

Posted 22 September 2005 - 02:39 AM

I'm working on an HD short, and the director wants the camera-mounted spotlight look Ellen Kuras did in "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind".  I'm wondering what kind of light I should rig to the camera.  In the film, the light is very hard and "spotty"...I doubt there was much/any diffusion.  It must have also been pretty bright--they shot 500-ASA, but the faces are often pretty blown-out.  In an article, Ellen Kuras said she used sodium & mercury vapor lights...I think this was just to balance temperature to streetlights, though. 

Many thanks for any suggestions/leads.
Justin

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



OOOPPPSS!!
Don't go with a news camera-light on camera!
One thing you can do, is to use a theatrical light or a fresnel light, let's say 1k, above your camera, and if you want the spot light effect the cut a circle on a cardboard, and place it away from your source. you can have the circle focused or diffused by moving the cardboard close to the light source for softenning edges, or away to make it more visible.
In case that the actor is moving a lot use the same technigue with a 500W fresnel on camera, but with the cardboard ahead of it.
I bet you can find a way to rig it to where u want.
Dimitrios Koukas
  • 0

#4 Tim J Durham

Tim J Durham
  • Sustaining Members
  • 742 posts
  • Director
  • East Coast, Baby!

Posted 22 September 2005 - 07:14 AM

OOOPPPSS!!
Don't go with a news camera-light on camera!
One thing you can do, is to use a theatrical light or a fresnel light, let's say 1k, above your camera, and if you want the spot light effect the cut a circle on a cardboard, and place it away from your source. you can have the circle focused or diffused by moving the cardboard close to the light source for softenning edges, or away to make it more visible.
In case that the actor is moving a lot use the same technigue with a 500W fresnel on camera, but with the cardboard ahead of it.
I bet you can find a way to rig it to where u want.
Dimitrios Koukas

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Yeah, That sounds ALOT easier than what I suggested.

Seriously, why turn something simple into a pain in the @ss?
  • 0

#5 Nate Downes

Nate Downes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1638 posts
  • Florida, USA

Posted 22 September 2005 - 08:25 AM

I'd use a standard spotlight (clamp-light) attached to the camera, and use a snoot.
  • 0

#6 Dimitrios Koukas

Dimitrios Koukas
  • Sustaining Members
  • 569 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Athens, Greece, London UK

Posted 22 September 2005 - 10:48 AM

Yeah, That sounds ALOT easier than what I suggested.

Seriously, why turn something simple into a pain in the @ss?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Just for Aesthetics, if you know what it is?
Dimitrios Koukas
  • 0

#7 Dimitrios Koukas

Dimitrios Koukas
  • Sustaining Members
  • 569 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Athens, Greece, London UK

Posted 22 September 2005 - 10:52 AM

I'd use a standard spotlight (clamp-light) attached to the camera, and use a snoot.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Sounds cool.
The problem with all this, is that when u have to follow the subject in a room it's quiet annoying, either ways, my way too.
Other thing u can do is having her holding her spotlight everywhere she goes!
Just jokin.
Dimitrios Koukas
  • 0

#8 Dimitrios Koukas

Dimitrios Koukas
  • Sustaining Members
  • 569 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Athens, Greece, London UK

Posted 22 September 2005 - 11:57 AM

Here is an example.
Dimitrios

Attached Images

  • DVD_VR_4.jpg

  • 0

#9 Matt Sandstrom

Matt Sandstrom
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 464 posts
  • Director
  • Stockholm, Sweden

Posted 22 September 2005 - 12:53 PM

it's been a while since i saw the film, but it seemed like the spolight source wasn't directly above the camera, was it? at least a few feet up and to one side in most of these shots? maybe i'm wrong, just a sugegstion. i'd probably do it that way and i think it would look more like a spotlight too since it would cast a visible shadow.

/matt
  • 0

#10 Dimitrios Koukas

Dimitrios Koukas
  • Sustaining Members
  • 569 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Athens, Greece, London UK

Posted 22 September 2005 - 04:05 PM

it's been a while since i saw the film, but it seemed like the spolight source wasn't directly above the camera, was it? at least a few feet up and to one side in most of these shots? maybe i'm wrong, just a sugegstion. i'd probably do it that way and i think it would look more like a spotlight too since it would cast a visible shadow.

/matt

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Mattias.
I am out of subject here,
I have just visited your site, very nice trailer, How long is the movie?
Dimitrios Koukas
u can msn me at DimitriosPilot@msn.com

Edited by Dimitrios Koukas, 22 September 2005 - 04:05 PM.

  • 0

#11 Matt Sandstrom

Matt Sandstrom
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 464 posts
  • Director
  • Stockholm, Sweden

Posted 22 September 2005 - 05:14 PM

thanks. the film is 14 minutes. i guess i should mention that on the site since a lot of people think it's a feature. (or maybe that's cool?) ;-)

since this is a cinematography site i should probably mention that i directed it but didn't shoot it. johan nordström did. check out his link on the site.

sorry if we're hijacking the thread. back to the spotlight thing; i'd be very interested in more opinions on that.

/matt
  • 0


Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

CineLab

CineTape

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Opal

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets