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1st AC on the SDX900


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#1 Annie Wengenroth

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Posted 21 September 2005 - 09:20 PM

I will be working with this camera in a few weeks as a 1st AC on a pretty big, multi-camera shoot. I am reasonably familiar with it already but was wondering if there's anything else I should keep in mind that I might not initially know about. I plan to take it out at work and play with it to refresh my memory, and of course I will obtain a copy of the manual as well, but if there are any random pointers anyone can think of, it would be cool to hear them. Thanks!
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#2 Gordon Highland

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Posted 21 September 2005 - 09:41 PM

Get your hands on the Goodman's Guide if you can; the regular manual is kind of obtuse.

A few things: Scene files are downloadable, I usually use the one called SCOPNORM as a starting point, and the Filmlike2 gamma. You lose about a stop in progressive mode. It's got two buttons on the side you can program, I like to set one to a digital 2x zoom to assist in focus. It's got a handy 4400 filter for shooting under fluoros or warming up tungsten shots. Watch your shutter speed and panning speeds in progressive mode. Keep the detail low. That's about it for non-obvious stuff off the top of my head. Have fun!
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#3 Christopher Wedding

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Posted 23 October 2005 - 09:15 AM

Get your hands on the Goodman's Guide if you can; the regular manual is kind of obtuse.

A few things: Scene files are downloadable, I usually use the one called SCOPNORM as a starting point, and the Filmlike2 gamma. You lose about a stop in progressive mode. It's got two buttons on the side you can program, I like to set one to a digital 2x zoom to assist in focus. It's got a handy 4400 filter for shooting under fluoros or warming up tungsten shots. Watch your shutter speed and panning speeds in progressive mode. Keep the detail low. That's about it for non-obvious stuff off the top of my head. Have fun!



What do you mean by 'watch' your panning and shutter speeds?
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 23 October 2005 - 10:46 AM

What do you mean by 'watch' your panning and shutter speeds?



Hi,

Fast pans will strobe!

Cheers

Stephen
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#5 Steve Ford

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Posted 27 October 2005 - 08:32 AM

When you talked about taking the camera out and running it through it's paces, great idea! That will be the best way to see for yourself that pan speed is limited, and zoom ratio plays a big part in dictating how fast a pan can move. You can get a way with more speed at 30p as compared to 24p, but it has a different "feel" at 30p. If this is a multi-camera shoot, I would also see how the other cameras are set so you can match the look.

Hope this helps

Steve
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