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Backlighting Difficulties


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#1 Rick Pearson

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 01:39 PM

The majority of work that I do for a local television station is often close quarters. I seem to rarely get the chance to back light properly on account of the space. And so I would like to get some creative and technical feedback from those of you with experience.

When adding a backlight to a subject what equipment do you find yourself utilizing? Do you have only a light on a stand, or do you use a boom to get the light in closer to the subject and keeping the lightstand out of the shot?

If a boom arm is not available for keeping a back light stand out of the shot, and there is not a way to rig it from a drop ceiling what do you find yourself doing to still use a backlight.

I work in a situation where there is no access to a lighting boom and I find backlighting a subject difficult and sometimes just impossible. I'm looking for advice from those who have the experience to turn me in the right direction. Thanks.
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#2 Matt Sandstrom

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 02:07 PM

autopoles are great and i've used them a lot lately. either between walls, which is what they're really for i guess, but also hung between two stands.

/matt
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#3 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 03:51 PM

The majority of work that I do for a local television station is often close quarters. I seem to rarely get the chance to back light properly on account of the space. And so I would like to get some creative and technical feedback from those of you with experience.

When adding a backlight to a subject what equipment do you find yourself utilizing? Do you have only a light on a stand, or do you use a boom to get the light in closer to the subject and keeping the lightstand out of the shot?

If a boom arm is not available for keeping a back light stand out of the shot, and there is not a way to rig it from a drop ceiling what do you find yourself doing to still use a backlight.

I work in a situation where there is no access to a lighting boom and I find backlighting a subject difficult and sometimes just impossible. I'm looking for advice from those who have the experience to turn me in the right direction. Thanks.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Rick,
You need solution for something else than the news? Or for actors that move on a set.Or a talk show?
For the first,I would suggest a set of dedolights, u can very easily stick their small base on the set, somewhere just outside your frame.
Also u can clamp on the set something like a Yaniro clamp, and use a flags arm as an extension.There u can rig a 500w fresnel or 300w.
I hope that I have been helpfull
Dimitrios Koukas

Edited by Dimitrios Koukas, 22 September 2005 - 03:52 PM.

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#4 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 06:52 PM

Hard lights are useful fot those hotter kicks and pfffffz's. But try experimenting with a bigger source closer and more toppy - it's a different feel but it can look less 'lit' in my view.

Actually, you shouldn't listen to me, 'cause I'm in my "backlight is the anti-Christ" phase right now... :P
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#5 Glenn Hanns

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 07:30 PM

When adding a backlight to a subject what equipment do you find yourself utilizing? Do you have only a light on a stand, or do you use a boom to get the light in closer to the subject and keeping the lightstand out of the shot?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Hi Rick,
If your shooting in an office situation for example, I use a plastic magic grip claw with a metal spigot. Rig this to the aluminum struts that hold up the foam ceiling tiles. I just lift a tile a little and clamp it on the frame.
Dont rig anything heaver than a 1K DP and use a safety chain attached to the aluminum frame.
Cheers G.
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#6 Glenn Hanns

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Posted 22 September 2005 - 07:34 PM

Hard lights are useful fot those hotter kicks and pfffffz's. But try experimenting with a bigger source closer and more toppy - it's a different feel but it can look less 'lit' in my view.

Actually, you shouldn't listen to me, 'cause I'm in my "backlight is the anti-Christ" phase right now... :P

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



I think backlight is a natural occurrence and a very acceptable style if done subtlety.
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#7 Paul Bruening

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 12:05 PM

If your light values are low enough on the front side then one or two utility calmp lights with 100 watt bulbs can serve you well. They are so light and the clamp so strong that they can be easily attached to anything that protrudes. Then, you tape the cords out of the shot. You can get them at the hardware store. There are about three different reflector sizes that fit them. They are flimsey so you often have to replace them. However, at $7.00 a unit, it's no biggie. A little JB Weld on the junction of the reflector and switch housing keeps them from stripping away from each other.

I use the heck out of them. I control their broad lightfall with small pieces of black matte board, bent and clamped to the reflector with clothes pins.I have a simple, PVC pipe cross-over rig that I tape the clamp to. It looks really cheap and unprofessional on the set. But, the viewer won't know the difference.
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#8 Ram Shani

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Posted 26 September 2005 - 01:37 AM

hi

if the shot is close from F.S and up what i do is i use c-stand and open the arm in 90 degrees (don't forget to lock the head in right hand and use sand beg)

at the end of it i put tweeny or red head or if i lucky small zip light with its egg-creat
in offices you can use sisers-clamp don't forget safty cable

ram
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