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apartment party scene


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#1 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 10:22 AM

Hey guys I am set to shoot a film in the end of October. It will be shot on 500t and we are going to push the film stock. Anyway in one of the scenes I have to figure out how to light a party scene inside of a apartment. A few people are dancing on the floor and others are sitting in chairs/sofa. Any recommendations would be helpful.
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#2 Bill Totolo

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 12:10 PM

Think about what the audience expects to see, then question if the antithesis would more interesting.
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#3 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 12:15 PM

Hey guys I am set to shoot a film in the end of October. It will be shot on 500t and we are going to push the film stock. Anyway in one of the scenes I have to figure out how to light a party scene inside of a apartment. A few people are dancing on the floor and others are sitting in chairs/sofa. Any recommendations would be helpful.
                Mario C. Jackson

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


An easy way is to use chinese lanterns, (chinnese ballons), with photoflood lamps 250w or 500w. U can hide them in corners and u can easily hang them from the ceiling.Also use black cinefoil or carton paper to cut unwanted light of them.
That's just an idea, it doesn't mean that u will have to follow it, u also can ask the art director or set designer to add as many practicals as he can in the set or u can choose them together and maybe u can go with the practicals and some fill light from the lanterns.
I don't know what would be your artistical approach, so I am just suggesting.
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#4 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 23 September 2005 - 01:26 PM

Hey guys I am set to shoot a film in the end of October. It will be shot on 500t and we are going to push the film stock. Anyway in one of the scenes I have to figure out how to light a party scene inside of a apartment. A few people are dancing on the floor and others are sitting in chairs/sofa. Any recommendations would be helpful.
                Mario C. Jackson

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Mario,
Sry I forgot to mention this .Use some led battery powered light for bicycles for the close ups. ;)
This will do a great difference to the things u have been experiment till now.
It will give u a great shine in the actors eyes.
Dimitrios Koukas
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#5 Paul Bruening

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 11:33 AM

Some of your trouble can be resolved directorialy, Once you get the wide shot to establish the set, you can go in closer and get rid of all the hassle associated with lighting wide shots in tight situations.
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#6 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 02:53 PM

Some of your trouble can be resolved directorialy, Once you get the wide shot to establish the set, you can go in closer and get rid of all the hassle associated with lighting wide shots in tight situations.

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What about the medium shots?
Most of it has a lot info in the background.
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#7 Jack Barker

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 06:00 PM

I like the chinese lanterns - poor man's softbox. IKEA has some nice tall cylindrical ones that take multiple bulbs, though their wattage recommendations are low You could probably get away with higher wattage lamps for short periods. They also come on sturdy stands and the whole paper shade is 4' to 6' tall, depending on model. If you put them on low tables at the edges of the room it should work pretty well. I have one shaped like a wine carafe which is 66" tall.

Edited by Jack Barker, 24 September 2005 - 06:00 PM.

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#8 Mario C. Jackson

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 09:31 PM

I really want the lighting in the scene to look consistent, so I am thinking of using china balls hung really high and setting them to a dimmer. I am also going to see if set design will set up as many practicals as possible.
Thanks
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#9 JP Creatives

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Posted 25 September 2005 - 01:00 PM

I really want the lighting in the scene to look consistent, so I am thinking of using china balls hung really high and setting them to a dimmer. I am also going to see if set design will set up as many practicals as possible.
                    Thanks

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Exactly, I was going to suggest that. I used 500 a lot on a feature not long ago. It is so fast we would constantly design practicals in the set and that would be all. It looked really natural and "consistent" from shot to shot since we rarely would have to move lights at all.

This technique isn't right for all projects, but it sounds like it might be what you are going for. Plus don't be afraid to do without the chinaballs. Have the confidence to allow some contrast. We would sometimes use so many practicals and chinaballs that it would suddenly become high key. By the end we really found out what little light you can get away with, especially with 500. Just a suggestion.

Good luck,

JP
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#10 Jamison Madison

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 12:36 PM

I think the China Ball suggestion is the one to go with. Usually in party scenes there are groups of people gathered around certain areas of the room, which gives the great opportunity to set the lanterns high above them. 

 

You're best friend here is going to be the set designer, make sure he sets up lots of practicals around the room so that the light is justifiable and the room doesn't look that plain. The practicals will also you help you bring up the ambience light in the room a little bit, if not, just have a 650 or something near by to bounce against the roof if you need a little bit more light than what the lanterns are given you, but i doubt you will need it.  


Edited by Jamison Madison, 19 March 2014 - 12:38 PM.

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#11 Francesco Marullo

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Posted 19 March 2014 - 06:09 PM

Imaging a room with 6 o 8 persons at the center:
 
If it were up to me, I would have to use a chinese balle (500w) at the center or with an assistant and boom then two (or one) 2Kw at the corner in background for backlight (hiding it, naturally) and I would have to use a 1kw bouncing a white reflector (or a kino flo), behind the camera (to left or right, never at the center of mdp) to fill any hard lights.
 
Do you have to use a steadycam?
 
ps: I'm agree with Jamison Madison that the set designer is your best friend.
 
 
F

Edited by Francesco Marullo, 19 March 2014 - 06:13 PM.

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