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Where to buy a diopter for my bad eyesight?


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#1 Giles Sherwood

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Posted 24 September 2005 - 09:12 PM

Hello,

As a sophomore, I recently gained access to the Arri SR-2 cameras at my school. Unfortunately, I can't really use them because my glasses don't allow me to apply enough pressure to the eyepiece to open up the light-gate, while the adjustable diopter is not strong enough to compensate for my bad eyes. I can't wear contacts because my eyes are extremely sensitive to even water and saline solution.

Does anyone know of where and for approximately how much I could expect to purchase an "extra-strength" diopter or some sort of diopter booster or anything that would allow me to use these cameras without my spectacles? This is a concern I have been anticipating for a while, but now it has become immediate because I have been assigned to shoot a fellow student's film in about two weeks.

I know the proper course of action would be "google it," but that hasn't gotten me any results. :\

Thanks,
Giles

Edited by Giles Sherwood, 24 September 2005 - 09:13 PM.

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#2 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 25 September 2005 - 03:38 AM

Hello,

As a sophomore, I recently gained access to the Arri SR-2 cameras at my school. Unfortunately, I can't really use them because my glasses don't allow me to apply enough pressure to the eyepiece to open up the light-gate, while the adjustable diopter is not strong enough to compensate for my bad eyes.  I can't wear contacts because my eyes are extremely sensitive to even water and saline solution.

Does anyone know of where and for approximately how much I could expect to purchase an "extra-strength" diopter or some sort of diopter booster or anything that would allow me to use these cameras without my spectacles?  This is a concern I have been anticipating for a while, but now it has become immediate because I have been assigned to shoot a fellow student's film in about two weeks.

I know the proper course of action would be "google it," but that hasn't gotten me any results. :\

Thanks,
Giles

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Is there any way that u could use gaffer tape to stick the eypiece open?Also make a hand made tap to put it on when u aren't shooting, and never take your eye off when u actually shoot.

Dimitrios Koukas
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#3 Riku Naskali

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Posted 25 September 2005 - 09:35 AM

I think you can "force" the viewfinder to be open, take off the cup and there's the mechanism that closes and opens it. Download a manual from Arri to be certain.

But it's still hard to shoot with glasses, you really can't get your eye close enough to see the whole image properly.
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#4 Charles Haine

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Posted 25 September 2005 - 11:41 AM

Have you contacted Arri, or your local camera shop? I know that optometrists make special diopters for still cameras, but with motion picture cameras, I think you've got to go to the manufacturer.

I remember seeing a stronger diopter in a rental catalogue somewhere, but I'm not sure it was an Arri catalogue.

chuck haine
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#5 Bob Hayes

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Posted 25 September 2005 - 05:33 PM

Take yoru prescription to a cheap eye care place and have them make a small round version of it. You do have some choices however.

1. Glass or Plastic? I buy glass it is much more expensive but doesn?t scratch and is infinitely easier to clean.

2. What size? All of the camera manufacturers make an eye cup adapter that holds a diopter. You just screw it in. So you can get the dimensions from them. Or if you are trying to have a generic size just measure and guess what size you need.

3. How is it held on? If you use the specialized eye cup it just pops right on. The down side is you need to order two; one for you and a normal one for your assistant and director. So you will incur extra cost. You just take the adapter to an eye care facility and have them make the diopter to fit. Also some rental houses don?t carry them. Also if you are day playing the show you show up on will not have that adapter. The other choice is to stick it on. I cut some heavy density foam that is about 1/3? thick and jam it in the eye cup. Then I cut a smaller hole inside to look through. This hole is slightly smaller then the diameter of my diopter. I cut a slit inside the circumference of the smaller hole and stick the diopter inside. Then I just pop the foam unit in and out.

4. Why not tape it in? Tape doesn?t stick well and you have problems pulling it off when the ac needs to look.

5. Stigmatisms require you twist the eye cup to line up the correction making it tougher to use especially when you have to rotate your head.
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