Jump to content


Photo

carnival, night, bolex


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Grainy

Grainy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Director

Posted 25 September 2005 - 01:10 PM

hi all - I'm going to shoot some carnival footage at a large, loud midway gun' n run style with a bolex and was wondering if anyone had any tips. I'm going to slightly undercrank a few things already and I think there's *enough* light, but I was wondering if anyone had any tips to make the colors pop. Maybe this should go in first time filmmakers, it's so basic, but I thought that with the variety of lights in a carnival (large area, individual for rides, moving rides) some folks might have some interesting ideas.
thanks!
G
  • 0

#2 Dimitrios Koukas

Dimitrios Koukas
  • Sustaining Members
  • 569 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Athens, Greece, London UK

Posted 25 September 2005 - 01:34 PM

hi all - I'm going to shoot some carnival footage at a large, loud midway gun' n run style with a bolex and was wondering if anyone had any tips. I'm going to slightly undercrank a few things already and I think there's *enough* light, but I was wondering if anyone had any tips to make the colors pop. Maybe this should go in first time filmmakers, it's so basic, but I thought that with the variety of lights in a carnival (large area, individual for rides, moving rides) some folks might have some interesting ideas.
thanks!
G

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Are u doing this alone? Or there is anyone with u that can hold a big maglite?
with a carton made softbox, or u can use anything like a practical fluo camping lamp that accepts batteries.
As for the colours, try to put your subjects as closer as u can to the ambient lighting.Near the lights the colours will ''pop'' especially if u overexpose by 1/2 f/stop, if this is applicable.
But having the light on your back you will loose the all the background, so why not
try to have the lights at your side,(left or right).
This is a general thought, and that doesn't mean that you have to go with it.
Many times when u going for this kind of shooting, the location and the action itself guides you.

Dimitrios Koukas
  • 0

#3 Grainy

Grainy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Director

Posted 25 September 2005 - 10:21 PM

Are u doing this alone? Or there is anyone with u that can hold a big maglite?
with a carton made softbox, or u can use anything like a practical fluo camping lamp that accepts batteries.
As for the colours, try to put your subjects as closer as u can to the ambient lighting.Near the lights the colours will ''pop'' especially if u overexpose by 1/2 f/stop, if this is applicable.
But having the light on your back you will loose the all the background, so why not
try to have the lights at your side,(left or right).
This is a general thought, and that doesn't mean that you have to go with it.
Many times when u going for this kind of shooting, the location and the action itself guides you.

Dimitrios Koukas

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I'm probably alone, and possibly w/o a permit (shhh!)
thanks Dimitrios!
EH
  • 0

#4 Sam Wells

Sam Wells
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1751 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 28 September 2005 - 12:23 PM

Shoot the poppiest colors !

Really you have to find the balance between not overexposing the electric sinage and visible lights and getting shadow detail. Of course with the modern negs shots can be printed down, ditto in telecine but you don't want to print the shadow detail down into darkness, probably.

What stock are you shooting ?

-Sam
  • 0

#5 Grainy

Grainy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Director

Posted 28 September 2005 - 12:56 PM

Shoot the poppiest colors !

Really you have to find the balance between not overexposing the electric sinage and visible lights and getting shadow detail. Of course with the modern negs shots can be printed down, ditto in telecine but you don't want to print the shadow detail down into darkness, probably.

What stock are you shooting ?

-Sam

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Hi Sam --
I'm actually leaning toward blacker, at least for the hard shadows, rather than softer black with more detail, if that makes sense.
Shooting either 7229 or 7218 VISION2 500T.
  • 0

#6 John Pytlak RIP

John Pytlak RIP

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 3499 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Rochester, NY 14650-1922

Posted 28 September 2005 - 01:38 PM

Hi Sam --
I'm actually leaning toward blacker, at least for the hard shadows, rather than softer black with more detail, if that makes sense.
Shooting either 7229 or 7218 VISION2 500T.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I'd go with the 7218. Give as "rich" an exposure as the light and your lens allows. The brighter lights will still be captured well because of the film's latitude. Undercranking will give more exposure, but motion will seem unnaturally fast (how fast can a ferris wheel actually turn or bumper cars bump?). If you really don't have the light, consider a push-1 process, with a slight increase in graininess and contrast.
  • 0

#7 Grainy

Grainy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Director

Posted 28 September 2005 - 03:57 PM

I'd go with the 7218.  Give as "rich" an exposure as the light and your lens allows.  The brighter lights will still be captured well because of the film's latitude.  Undercranking will give more exposure, but motion will seem unnaturally fast (how fast can a ferris wheel actually turn or bumper cars bump?).  If you really don't have the light, consider a push-1 process, with a slight increase in graininess and contrast.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


right on, thanks John. With each stock at 500, what would the 7218 do for me in this case?
(I don't mind a little pixilation for some of these shots -- I'll probably try a bit of both)
thanks
G
  • 0

#8 Dimitrios Koukas

Dimitrios Koukas
  • Sustaining Members
  • 569 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Athens, Greece, London UK

Posted 29 September 2005 - 08:23 AM

I'm probably alone, and possibly w/o a permit (shhh!)
thanks Dimitrios!
EH

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Try then the fluorescent camp lamp with batteries and rig it on the camera somehow if u can.
Just to add some fill, carefull the colour temperature of the lamp though, I bet it will need some correction.
Dimitrios
  • 0

#9 John Pytlak RIP

John Pytlak RIP

    (deceased)

  • Sustaining Members
  • 3499 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Rochester, NY 14650-1922

Posted 29 September 2005 - 09:17 AM

right on, thanks John. With each stock at 500, what would the 7218 do for me in this case?
(I don't mind a little pixilation for some of these shots -- I'll probably try a bit of both)
thanks
G

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


For shots that include lighted signs against a night sky, I'd prefer the higher contrast of the 7218 to the VISION2 500T Expression 7229 -- with the same exposure, the blacks will tend to be a bit "richer". Both films have great latitude.

The softer palette of the 7229 is very kind to flesh tones, and would be a good choice for a period picture.
  • 0

#10 Grainy

Grainy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 65 posts
  • Director

Posted 29 September 2005 - 09:53 AM

great tips, thanks everyone!
G
  • 0


Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

CineTape

The Slider

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

Willys Widgets

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

FJS International, LLC

Opal

Glidecam

Visual Products

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Visual Products

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

CineLab

Tai Audio

Opal

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS