Jump to content


Photo

Cleaning up a 16/35 Cameflex


  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1 Thomas Hayes

Thomas Hayes

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Student
  • Melbourne, Australia

Posted 26 September 2005 - 12:44 AM

Howdy,

Just seeking a bit of advice regarding the restoration of a rather dirty and slightly corroded 16/35 Cameflex. The 16/35 400ft mags, 16mm gate, and host of extra lenses are in great nick, but the actual camera body is absolutely covered in superficial mold and rust, and a bit of not-so-superficial stuff (corroded aluminium knobs etc). The viewfinder doesn't seem to want to rotate. Haven't taken the turret off yet and looked inside - want to clean up the exterior first. That grey stuff on the lenses (see below) came about as a consequence of the camera becoming one with the foam in its road case.

Any suggestions for chemicals, rags, techniques, brands of toothbrush etc? Any warnings?

Here are some photos (25% original size):
Posted Image

Posted Image

I'm especially concerned about the brown gunk around the gate area:
Posted Image

Also, any idea as to what this thing is? It has what looks like a ground glass (?) or something at the back, with 16/35mm frame markings.
Posted Image

Edited by Thomas Hayes, 26 September 2005 - 12:50 AM.

  • 0

#2 Nate Downes

Nate Downes
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1638 posts
  • Florida, USA

Posted 26 September 2005 - 07:43 AM

Also, any idea as to what this thing is? It has what looks like a ground glass (?) or something at the back, with 16/35mm frame markings.
Posted Image

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


It's a loupe, used to peek through the camera gate so as to get critical focus.
  • 0

#3 Dimitrios Koukas

Dimitrios Koukas
  • Sustaining Members
  • 569 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Athens, Greece, London UK

Posted 26 September 2005 - 08:59 AM

Howdy,

Just seeking a bit of advice regarding the restoration of a rather dirty and slightly corroded 16/35 Cameflex. The 16/35 400ft mags, 16mm gate, and host of extra lenses are in great nick, but the actual camera body is absolutely covered in superficial mold and rust, and a bit of not-so-superficial stuff (corroded aluminium knobs etc). The viewfinder doesn't seem to want to rotate. Haven't taken the turret off yet and looked inside - want to clean up the exterior first. That grey stuff on the lenses (see below) came about as a consequence of the camera becoming one with the foam in its road case.

Any suggestions for chemicals, rags, techniques, brands of toothbrush etc? Any warnings?


<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


First of all u can use some wire brushes, and of different types.One nylon, one stainless and one brass.
Try carefully, without any chemicals on for a start.
If u see that u re starting to scratch the camera somehow, then u can use some chemicals like methylated alcohol, or petroleum, but do it with great caution.
Try not to put alcohol on any flange, and remove all the external flanges of the camera.
Petroleum is far more soft to the flanges.
U will need many pieces of clean cloth to use in case petroleum starting to drip.
I would use petroleum for the gate too.
After u finish cleanning u should pass the whole camera with some silicon spray.
(Outside).
Try the same with mags, WD40 is good for rust too, but not good for plastics
So do it with great caution.Also try the surfaces before u put anything on them.
For the inside I believe many parts were used to get lubrication from oils made for sewing machines.
Dimitrios Koukas
  • 0

#4 Thomas Hayes

Thomas Hayes

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Student
  • Melbourne, Australia

Posted 27 September 2005 - 09:28 AM

Thankyou downix, thankyou Dimitrios.

Try not to put alcohol on any flange, and remove all the external flanges of the camera.
Petroleum is far more soft to the flanges.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

What be these 'flanges' of which you speak? I have never heard that word used in this context - I'm highly inexperienced with the use of cine cameras. Can you see any of these flange things in my photos?
  • 0

#5 curtis olsen

curtis olsen

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 19 November 2006 - 01:19 PM

It's a loupe, used to peek through the camera gate so as to get critical focus.


Hi Thomas:

Nice loupe. Let me know if you care to sell it.
Thanks
Curtis
curtisno@netptc.net
  • 0

#6 Andreas Burgess

Andreas Burgess

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 4 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, CA

Posted 27 November 2006 - 09:22 PM

Hope all the goo comes off. I'm a big Eclair fan (I have a CM3 also). If you ever need to send it somewhere, there's a guy here in LA named George at the Optical-Electro House who is great with old Eclairs. I take mine to him whenever it needs serious service:

http://www.opticalelectrohouse.com/

As far as the eyepiece not rotating - not the worst thing ever, as it's not self-rectifying (if it pivots, so does the movie inside). If you're looking for a crystal motor, Tobin makes a pretty inexpensive one, although it unfortunately prevents the turret from rotating.

Sorry for the ramble. Enjoy your eclair.

ANDREAS
  • 0

#7 James Compton

James Compton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 311 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 29 November 2006 - 04:53 PM

The guy you want to talk to is Bernie O'Doerhty. He WORKED AT ECLAIR as a camera technician.
You can reach him here :

http://www.super16inc.com/

He still repairs Ecalirs of all types and recently held a seminar about servicing your own camera in
the field.
  • 0

#8 Ian Marks

Ian Marks
  • Guests

Posted 29 November 2006 - 07:43 PM

A Kinoptik loupe - I never thought I'd see that... I think that device fits against the gate to provide critical focussing, or maybe even to help with adjusting the backfocus of lenses. Bolex has a similar device.

Edited by Ian Marks, 29 November 2006 - 07:44 PM.

  • 0


The Slider

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Metropolis Post

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

Glidecam

Abel Cine

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Opal

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Ritter Battery