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Dreyer's Jooan of Arc


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#1 Steven Budden

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Posted 27 September 2005 - 12:24 PM

Any advice for getting a look like that of Dreyer's Joan of Arc? Both in terms of thecontrast, high level of detail (in facial features specifically), full tonal range. I also like the way the lens is crystal clear in the center and vignettes in certain corners and edges... what is that caused by and how might I reproduce that effect generall (I'm using a bolex reflex right now)?

I'm shooting Fomapan reversal but I'm also open to trying Kodak neg or tri x.

Also, I'm not using computers so I'd like to duplicate the effect during shooting.

Any insight appreciated. Thanks!


Steven
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#2 Joseph White

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Posted 27 September 2005 - 01:35 PM

this is truly a gorgeous film certainly worthy of emulation. i'd say try shooting kodak's 16mm black and white reversal 7265 - if you're doing interiors you'll need a bunch of light, but i mean when dreyer's film was made they were working with slower emulsions and thus i always think its interesting to try and recreate not just the look but to some degree the conditions of the shoot you are trying to match. i've used 7265 on a music video and was really impressed with the stock's sharpness particularly at the normal to telephoto lens range (was shooting on an arri-s w/ an old angenieux coke bottle). every time i see a period costume drama with lots of kinos everywhere i kinda call bs...

in terms of the focus drifting in the corners, i'd say try playing around with a clear filter and some vaseline applied in the corners you're trying to soften. there's also diopters, but i'm not sure whats available for a bolex. i'm sure some of our esteemed members will have much to say on these topics. but kudos on trying to bring back this look - Rudolph Mate was an absolute genius and photographed many luminous, dark, lush masterpieces - Joan and Vampyr being my personal favorites.

good luck!
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#3 Steven Budden

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 11:08 AM

Thanks!

Some of the scenes lose focus at the edges and others fade completely to black. I find this interesting, and assume it has something to do with lens choices not quite covering the whole frame. But why on this film and not others from this era, because that particular aspect doesn't seem always intentional.

Also, I'm thinking of hand processing to get that slight irregularity. I'll try the vaseline on the filter. Sounds a bit risky!

Would I do well to use an old uncoated lens or the sharpest lens I can find and make the adjustments elsewhere?

The fomapan I'm using now is 100 ASA. What do you think the speed of the film Dreyer used was? It kind of looks like filming speeds were adjusted sometimes for exposure compensation (though it's hard to ascertain without sound.)

I've just never seen such painterly facial detail. There are scened where every eyelash and every wrinkle is perfectly carved out in light.

Steven
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#4 daniel mahlknecht

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Posted 03 October 2005 - 02:13 PM

hi,
try to put on a super8 c-mount zoomlens on your bolexand zoom to a position, where the lens starts to cover 16mm, this should give you the darkening effect on the edges and it gets softer the more you open the iris.
I have tried a 6-70 zoom of a beaulieu zm4, it worked but I had to use the lens at 60mm otherwise the effect was to strong. No direct light must hit the lens, otherwise you would see the metalstructure of the lensbarrel.

An easier way might be cutting a round hole from a lback cartboard and fix it in front of the sunshade, being so close to the lens it should blure and give you the desired effect (of course also this depending on the focal lenght and the iris used)

daniel
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