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Fuji 250T (8552)


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#1 Fulgencio Martinez

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Posted 27 September 2005 - 07:31 PM

Hi,
I´m about to shoot a short film. The idea was to shoot S16 using kodak vision2 200T and then go through HD DI to 35mm. (D5)
Last news i´ve got is the director got all the rests (i don´t know the english word for the pieces of film left) from a long feature.
So now we´ve got 35mm Fuji 8552.
I´ve never used this film so i´d like to know your thoughts about it.
The film is supossed to be in good shape. I´m going to cut about a meter and send it to the lab to make sure it´s ok. Should i test each reel? They all come from the same place.
Although i´ve shoot miles and miles of 16mm it´s my first time as a DoP with 35mm so help any will be wellcomed.
how about shooting 3perf and keeping the HD DI route?
Thanks
Fulgencio
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#2 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 27 September 2005 - 07:54 PM

the rests (i don´t know the english word for the pieces of film left)


It's called "short ends" in english.

If you can make sure about the way they were kept since they were used, maybe you could test 1 roll on 5, for instance.

Maybe you can get to know the name of the production company who sold them, then the name of the 1st AC...

Thing is when where they bought/used ?

second : examine carefully the roll numbers, are they all from the same batch ? If not, test each batch, thing I would do even if they were brand new.
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#3 JP Creatives

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Posted 27 September 2005 - 08:06 PM

Hi,
I´m about to shoot a short film. The idea was to shoot S16 using kodak vision2 200T and then go through HD DI to 35mm. (D5)
Last news i´ve got is the director got all the rests (i don´t know the english word for the pieces of film left) from a long feature.
So now we´ve got 35mm Fuji 8552.
I´ve never used this film so i´d like to know your thoughts about it.
The film is supossed to be in good shape. I´m going to cut about a meter and send it to the lab to make sure it´s ok. Should i test each reel? They all come from the same place.
Although i´ve shoot miles and miles of 16mm it´s my first time as a DoP with 35mm so help any will be wellcomed.
how about shooting 3perf and keeping the HD DI route?
Thanks
Fulgencio

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


"Short ends" are what we call the left overs. I have shot both fuji F100t (16mm) and F500t and eterna 500t (35mm). I love fuji, particularly the rich colors. New Kodak stocks often are more brown I've noticed.

It is a good idea to send some of the film to the lab because I have heard some nightmares about shortends. Not to scare you, most of the time you get what you are told you are getting, but on rare occasion...

If you are getting the ends from a reputable reseller I wouldn't worry at all. If you are just getting them as hand me downs talk to your director and find out more about where exactly they came from and if they have been inspected. Or if you will have at least an estimated amount of feet on each roll. What if the source was a complete stranger? You might want to find out.

As far as shooting 35mm, and people might say otherwise, if you have shot miles of 16mm then there is nothing to worry about. You want to know the difference? Less grain, incredible sharpness, less depth of field, and your movie will look like the movies you see in the cinema.

I shot only a couple thousand feet of 16mm before jumping right into a 35mm feature and although it sounds ridiculous, there was not a problem. It will look better, simply said. Have no fear, jump in there and treat it like your bitch.

Some Still Frames (35mm FUji 500t)

JP
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#4 Mike Williamson

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Posted 27 September 2005 - 08:32 PM

35mm makes your life easy in terms of lighting, you get more detail and you can let things go in terms of exposure more than with any other format. It basically makes you look really, really good.

One of the more difficult aspects that I encountered was that focus is much more critical, as 35mm is very sharp and the depth of field is more limited than 16mm for example. Artistically helpful, but makes focus-pulling harder, so deeper stops become helpful if you don't have an experienced first AC. Not that it was a huge problem, but the size and weight of the camera I used most recently (Arri BL-4) was more than I expected, as I'd been used to working with an SR2 previously. I should mention that I was both DP and operator on my last project.

As far as aspect ratio, go for what works for the story, but it would probably be easier to shoot regular 1.85. Doing an HD-DI seems like a waste to me, I'd rather have a nice direct print. Good luck with it!
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#5 Joseph White

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Posted 27 September 2005 - 11:52 PM

yeah fuji 250t is great - looks nice pushed a stop on 35mm (starts to fall apart a bit on 16mm i've found with this particular stock) too.

3-perf is great if you're definitely doing a DI. you shoot 25% less film which is always nice. the cameras can sometimes run a bit more for this setup, but its worth it for a proper movie. i'd say super 35mm 3 perf is the way to go - can shoot whatever aspect ratio you want since you're DI - so heck go 2.35:1 ! (or, you know, whatever suits the story...)

happy shooting! let us know how it goes!
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#6 Stephen Williams

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 01:59 AM

Hi,
I´m about to shoot a short film. The idea was to shoot S16 using kodak vision2 200T and then go through HD DI to 35mm. (D5)

Fulgencio

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Hi,

8552 is my favourite Fuji Stock and I have shot more of it than anythine else over the last 5 years based mainly on cost savings. It has slightly more grain than Kodak 5217. 5217 is slightly sharper and slightly lower saturation. I rate them both at 200 asa for telecine transfer.
If you plan to shoot 'Through the Base' the Fuji ram jet is much much darker!

Stephen
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#7 Fulgencio Martinez

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 08:35 PM

Hi Stephen,
what does shooting "Throught the base" mean
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#8 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 10:07 PM

Hi Stephen,
what does shooting "Throught the base" mean

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Exposing the film with the base (rem-jet) side facing the lens. The rem-jet reduces exposure by several stops, the red sensitive (bottom) layer gets much more relative exposure than the green sensitive (middle) and blue sensitive (top) layers, and the color is further messed up by the lack of a yellow filter dye layer protecting the bottom two layers. NOT a normal procedure, NOT a normal "look".
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#9 Fulgencio Martinez

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 09:42 AM

Hi,
the film comes from a long feature and it has been given for free.
The thing is it was used 2 years ago! summer-autum 2003
Does it make sense testing the film or is it two much time to be useful?
the crew was a well respected one so i guess it was treated right but it might be too much time

Hi,
the film comes from a long feature and it has been given for free.
The thing is it was used 2 years ago! summer-autum 2003
Does it make sense testing the film or is it two much time to be useful?
the crew was a well respected one so i guess it was treated right but it might be too much time
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Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

The Slider

Abel Cine

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Opal