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"Greatest Game" Kodachrome!


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#1 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 08:08 AM

http://www.freep.com...8e_20050928.htm


The Greatest Game Ever Played'
Directed by Bill Paxton; written and produced by Mark Frost

Opens Friday

Rated PG; some mild language

2 hours

Golf film fits the style to the action

Bill Paxton directs 'Greatest Game'

September 28, 2005

BY JOHN MONAGHAN
FREE PRESS SPECIAL WRITER

Bill Paxton and Mark Frost saw it firsthand when they watched Tiger Woods approach the first tee at the Los Angeles Open.

"He walked up, took the yardage chart from his pocket. Examined it, didn't even look back as the caddy handed him his four iron, then he hit it a mile," remembers Paxton.

It was this level of concentration that director Paxton and writer-producer Frost set out to capture in "The Greatest Game Ever Played."

Opening Friday, the Disney-produced drama charts amateur Francis Ouimet's victory over British champion Harry Varner at the 1913 U.S. Open.

In Birmingham to promote the film, the filmmakers, along with star Shia LaBeouf, made the case that "The Greatest Game Ever Played" is a different kind of golf movie. Critics and preview audiences have responded favorably to its tale of a working class kid who goes from caddy to superstar.

"We felt this was a story with dual protagonists," Frost says. "If there is a villain in the piece, it's the class system." Ouimet and Vardon "both had to struggle against it in their own countries in their own ways."

Paxton, the nice-guy actor, saw an opportunity to show he could helm a studio film. His directorial debut, 2002's "Frailty," garnered excellent reviews for Paxton, who also played a murderer.

Paxton adds flair to the visuals, from using saturated Kodachrome film stock to showing the different ways the golfers approach the game. As Vardon eyes the pin, computer effects remove everything that blocks his path, including trees and spectators. "I found that kind of concentration inherently dramatic," Paxton says.

For some of Ouimet's shots, Paxton borrowed a visual trick from Hitchcock's "Vertigo" to bring the pin from background to foreground.

The director has even worked a Beatles motif into his film. Most obvious is the "Yellow Submarine"-inspired credit sequence.

Paxton did what he could to depict the excitement of golf. "It's a sport that is pastoral by nature," he says. "But I wanted to give people an idea of what it's like to stand out there on the tee. ... It's really a head game."

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So what kodachrome film gauge did he shoot? Was it 16mm?
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#2 Boone Hudgins

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 01:39 AM

According to American Cinematographer, they used 5245 (EXR 50D) for exteriors, and made it look like old Kodachrome slide film in the DI. They used 5229 indoors.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 08:55 AM

According to American Cinematographer, they used 5245 (EXR 50D) for exteriors, and made it look like old Kodachrome slide film in the DI.  They used 5229 indoors.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


That's the October 2005 issue of American Cinematographer.

Alex: I wrote you yesterday that cinematographer Shane Hurlbut likely did not actually use KODACHROME film, but tried to emulate its "look" for some shots.

Color negative films are almost always a better choice for duplication or transfer.
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#4 Sam Wells

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 12:05 PM

One more argument for Kodak to NOT drop 5245/7245.

(Also I'll be curious to see this movie & how the Kodachrome emulation worked or did not).

-Sam
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#5 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 01:19 PM

That's the October 2005 issue of American Cinematographer.

Alex:  I wrote you yesterday that cinematographer Shane Hurlbut likely did not actually use KODACHROME film, but tried to emulate its "look" for some shots.


Yes, but that was after I had already posted the topic.


Color negative films are almost always a better choice for duplication or transfer.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


But when I see some films that have been crushed excessively in the DI process, I think it would have been cool to just shoot Kodachrome to begin with.
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