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HD700 - Light Hog?


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#1 Sharon Pieczenik

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 10:23 AM

Hi. I'm a first time forum user. I'm a graduate student in a documentary film program. I have the opportunity to use the schools HD700 to go up to film polar bears in Churchill, Canada. I've been playing with the camera (we didn't have much, if any, time on them this first year of school) and it seems that the camera needs a lot of light to function well. This seems odd to me as I thought the higher performance cameras are more sensitive to light. Is a setting in one of the many fun menus off? Have I found the cameras limitations? I really don't want to have to add gain to my images.

Thank you for your help.

Cheers,
Sharon
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#2 Tim J Durham

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 12:29 PM

Hi.  I'm a first time forum user.  I'm a graduate student in a documentary film program.  I have the opportunity to use the schools HD700 to go up to film polar bears in Churchill, Canada.  I've been playing with the camera (we didn't have much, if any, time on them this first year of school) and it seems that the camera needs a lot of light to function well.  This seems odd to me as I thought the higher performance cameras are more sensitive to light.  Is a setting in one of the many fun menus off?  Have I found the cameras limitations?  I really don't want to have to add gain to my images.

Thank you for your help.

Cheers,
Sharon

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

That camera has a "fun" menu? Sweet.

Seriously, Out on pack ice shooting polar bears, low light isn't gonna be your biggest problem.
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#3 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 01:31 PM

That camera has a "fun" menu? Sweet.

Seriously, Out on pack ice shooting polar bears, low light isn't gonna be your biggest problem.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


If you use a film camera, Kodak has some hints for "artic photography":

http://www.kodak.com...ubs/c9/c9.jhtml

Film has been successfully used for artic cinematography since well before"Nanook of the North" in 1922: B)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0013427/
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#4 Chris Burke

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 02:00 PM

Hi.  I'm a first time forum user.  I'm a graduate student in a documentary film program.  I have the opportunity to use the schools HD700 to go up to film polar bears in Churchill, Canada.  I've been playing with the camera (we didn't have much, if any, time on them this first year of school) and it seems that the camera needs a lot of light to function well.  This seems odd to me as I thought the higher performance cameras are more sensitive to light.  Is a setting in one of the many fun menus off?  Have I found the cameras limitations?  I really don't want to have to add gain to my images.

Thank you for your help.

Cheers,
Sharon

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



what is the operating temperature for that camera? Lots of electronic equipment will not function that well in extreme cold. Have fun. I am very envious.

chris
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#5 Sharon Pieczenik

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 02:51 PM

Sharon here again. Well right now, Churchill is not that lovely white polar bear on white snow look. It is fall and brown and the days are grey.

Also, a lot of the film is on a Science Leadership Program for children so I will be filming them inside. I am trying to bring up one small Arri light and one onboard camera light but I have some restrictions with what I can bring up weight wise on the planes.

Has anyone found that the 700 needs a lot of light or am I looking at this all wrong?

Thanks,
Sharon
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#6 Sharon Pieczenik

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 03:07 PM

what is the operating temperature for that camera? Lots of electronic equipment will not function that well in extreme cold. Have fun. I am very envious.

chris

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32 F to 104 F...but I talked to some guys who have brought HD cameras up there and they say it works. Luckily I'll be in a warm tundra buggy a lot...but unluckily I will move from warm tundra buggy to cold outside platform - trick to acclimatizing (spelling?) gear.


Cheers,
Sharon
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#7 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 03:27 PM

32 F to 104 F...but I talked to some guys who have brought HD cameras up there and they say it works.  Luckily I'll be in a warm tundra buggy a lot...but unluckily I will move from warm tundra buggy to cold outside platform - trick to acclimatizing (spelling?) gear.
Cheers,
Sharon

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Watch out for moisture condensation issues if you bring a cold camera inside.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Willys Widgets