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#1 Anastasia Loguinova

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 12:11 PM

Hi everybody,

I decided to make a small show reel, but I don't have experience in such things. (in Russia it is not popular way of promoting yourself). I slightly imagine how to do it but any ideas and advices from you will be appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Anastasia
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#2 Lars.Erik

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 03:57 PM

There isn't any rule about it. But it's quite common that the reel is between 3-5 minutes long.

I tend to add the pictures where one sees that I can handle myself in different situations. That being ligthing, composure and movement. The reel isn't a story. It's basically just pictures put together which is telling the producer/director looking at the reel that you are qualified for the different things they are looking for.

But one can also just put for example 5 commercials ones done. There are many ways to do it. But the basic thing is not to have it too long. A reel is just a door opener. To let you come to a interview with the producer.

You may want to add some music to the reel. If you can, have some colleagues lok at it, or post it here. People will then tell you what they think of it.
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#3 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 08:04 AM

Hi everybody,

I decided to make  a small show reel, but I don't have experience in such things. (in Russia it is not popular way of promoting yourself). I slightly imagine how to do it but any ideas and advices from you will be appreciated.

Thanks in advance,
Anastasia

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Anastasia
One good thing to do is have sections of different jobs you ve done, so one can go directly to what section is interested to see from u.
Each section must not be more that 2-3 minutes.
So u can have documentaties section, feature films, tv adverts, commercials and so on.
Dimitrios Koukas
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#4 Jaan Shenberger

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 11:40 AM

Hi everybody,

I decided to make  a small show reel, but I don't have experience in such things. (in Russia it is not popular way of promoting yourself)

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



anastasia, what is the standard practice in russia for promoting oneself? is it all by personal contacts/references?
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#5 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 12:13 PM

anastasia, what is the standard practice in russia for promoting oneself? is it all by personal contacts/references?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


I guess it is like this,
In Greece it's the same, noone ever see your reells or reading your bio's.
Dimitrios Koukas
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#6 Anastasia Loguinova

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Posted 03 October 2005 - 01:56 AM

I guess it is like this,
In Greece it's the same, noone ever see your reells or reading your bio's.
Dimitrios Koukas


Mostly by personal contacts.
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#7 Dan Salzmann

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 03:11 PM

Have a 3-5 minute "compilation" and then several sections for commercials, music videos, shorts and features.
An "MTV-style" montage edit makes feature excerpts look ridiculous especially when producers are looking for ability to handle longer shots.
Only show your best work.
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#8 Joseph White

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Posted 04 October 2005 - 03:41 PM

i think one of the main tricks with the whole reel process is to be adaptable to different types of projects. it might be a good idea if you have a decent computer is to learn programs like dvd studio pro so that you can adapt your raw media to projects you're applying for. i've often found that less is more in terms of presentation - don't go crazy with lavish menus and whatnot as people generally just want to easily navigate through your stuff. but i've found that, for instance, when applying for a horror film, i can throw together a quick 2-3 minute piece consisting of darker material custom for that gig. this is not to say that all reels need to literally emulate what you think the job wants - who knows your romantic lighting might get you a great slasher flick - but the ability to make reels in an almost custom manner can help you a great deal.

and music is a great thing to have as well. something without vocals is generally a good idea as well, as you don't want anything distracting the viewer from your images.
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#9 Anastasia Loguinova

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 12:27 PM

i think one of the main tricks with the whole reel process is to be adaptable to different types of projects. it might be a good idea if you have a decent computer is to learn programs like dvd studio pro so that you can adapt your raw media to projects you're applying for. i've often found that less is more in terms of presentation - don't go crazy with lavish menus and whatnot as people generally just want to easily navigate through your stuff. but i've found that, for instance, when applying for a horror film, i can throw together a quick 2-3 minute piece consisting of darker material custom for that gig. this is not to say that all reels need to literally emulate what you think the job wants - who knows your romantic lighting might get you a great slasher flick - but the ability to make reels in an almost custom manner can help you a great deal.

and music is a great thing to have as well. something without vocals is generally a good idea as well, as you don't want anything distracting the viewer from your images.



Thank you all for the precious information! I'll take it into consideration and as soon as I make the reel I'll post it here so you could judge.

Anastasia
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#10 Adam Frisch FSF

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 01:59 PM

Here's my take on what to include on reels:

1. Kill your darlings - only the very best should be on your reel.

2. Never show stuff that isn't finished or where somethings is off - people can't "imagine" what
it would look like completed.

3. Don't overstay your welcome - I'd say maximum 1 minute cutdown of a music video, preferably less. Commercials can be shown full length. Shorts should be cut downs or trailers, at least as an option.

4. Content is more important than look. Yes, you'd think professionals could judge, but they can't. That
means that a funny, witty, recognizeable, famous commercial but with a less interesting look should go before a shitty one with a great look.

5. Commercials with a big director, big actor, big name or big budget, even if they're poop, should be included. People are starstruck.

6. Avoid the collage as they tend to signal 'beginner with not enough coherent stuff to show'. Commercial directors want to see full length spots that shows how you master the whole process, not fast edited stuff stringed together to cool music. But if you're starting out, then this is often your only choice.

7. Less is more. Chris Cunningham famously had just one thing on his reel, his Björk-video with the robots.
And who can blame him?

8. If your unsure about including something, then you should probably not include it.

As for how to physically do them? I do everything in my little laptop - edit, master a DVD and then burn it out on my little built-in superdrive. Bit of a leraning curve to get to know the software, but it beats paying
some post house millions of dollars. Mine are all taken from DV or uncompressed Quicktime files - no need to digitize expensive D1 tapes, nobody can see the difference anyway.

Good luck!
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#11 Eric Steelberg ASC

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 04:45 PM

Here's my take on what to include on reels:

1. Kill your darlings - only the very best should be on your reel.

2. Never show stuff that isn't finished or where somethings is off - people can't "imagine" what
it would look like completed.

3. Don't overstay your welcome - I'd say maximum 1 minute cutdown of a music video, preferably less. Commercials can be shown full length. Shorts should be cut downs or trailers, at least as an option.

4. Content is more important than look. Yes, you'd think professionals could judge, but they can't. That
means that a funny, witty, recognizeable, famous commercial but with a less interesting look should go before a shitty one with a great look.

5. Commercials with a big director, big actor, big name or big budget, even if they're poop, should be included. People are starstruck.

6. Avoid the collage as they tend to signal 'beginner with not enough coherent stuff to show'. Commercial directors want to see full length spots that shows how you master the whole process, not fast edited stuff stringed together to cool music. But if you're starting out, then this is often your only choice.

7. Less is more. Chris Cunningham famously had just one thing on his reel, his Björk-video with the robots.
And who can blame him?

8. If your unsure about including something, then you should probably not include it.

As for how to physically do them? I do everything in my little laptop - edit, master a DVD and then burn it out on my little built-in superdrive. Bit of a leraning curve to get to know the software, but it beats paying
some post house millions of dollars. Mine are all taken from DV or uncompressed Quicktime files - no need to digitize expensive D1 tapes, nobody can see the difference anyway.

Good luck!



That's great advice. I would've recommended the same thing.
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#12 Anastasia Loguinova

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 02:37 AM

Here's my take on what to include on reels:

1. Kill your darlings - only the very best should be on your reel.

2. Never show stuff that isn't finished or where somethings is off - people can't "imagine" what
it would look like completed.

3. Don't overstay your welcome - I'd say maximum 1 minute cutdown of a music video, preferably less. Commercials can be shown full length. Shorts should be cut downs or trailers, at least as an option.

4. Content is more important than look. Yes, you'd think professionals could judge, but they can't. That
means that a funny, witty, recognizeable, famous commercial but with a less interesting look should go before a shitty one with a great look.

5. Commercials with a big director, big actor, big name or big budget, even if they're poop, should be included. People are starstruck.

6. Avoid the collage as they tend to signal 'beginner with not enough coherent stuff to show'. Commercial directors want to see full length spots that shows how you master the whole process, not fast edited stuff stringed together to cool music. But if you're starting out, then this is often your only choice.

7. Less is more. Chris Cunningham famously had just one thing on his reel, his Björk-video with the robots.
And who can blame him?

8. If your unsure about including something, then you should probably not include it.

As for how to physically do them? I do everything in my little laptop - edit, master a DVD and then burn it out on my little built-in superdrive. Bit of a leraning curve to get to know the software, but it beats paying
some post house millions of dollars. Mine are all taken from DV or uncompressed Quicktime files - no need to digitize expensive D1 tapes, nobody can see the difference anyway.

Good luck!



That's really great!!! Such a detailed scheme! I'll try to follow it, THANKS.

Anastasia
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Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

The Slider

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Willys Widgets

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine