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Bodybuilding Competition Lighting


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#1 Glen Hunter

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Posted 28 September 2005 - 10:41 PM

I am a student gaffer and have recently been asked to light an amateur bodybuilding competition. There are some unusual constraints...a one camera setup directly in front of the stage (from the judges position), with 12 contestants in a line across the stage. To make matters more interesting the ceiling is only 10 feet high, so space for lighting trees, scaffolds etc is limited. The competition organisers are disappointed with previous-years results as the images have been too flat (the previous gaffer used PAR64's with red gel, which looked very rock 'n' roll but left the competitors looking rather flat and dark). For normal bodybuilding shots I would normally use a strong top light or back light to increase muscle definition, or if taking a shot of individual contestants would also use side light. My question is, with 12 contestants, is there an "economical" way of lighting all 12 to improve muscle definition without having lamps hanging 3 feet about their heads, or pointing into the eyes of the audience/camera? As it is an amateur comp the budget is also very limited, and the organisers want the lighting to be as inconspicuous as possible!

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#2 Ram Shani

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 01:36 AM

hi

i think the best way is to use a soft top light that way the shadows on the body builders will give them shape. kino-flo is a good tool to use. i'd put it top but a little infront off them . maybe ad 2 kickers on stends (2 baby 1k)

you can play with diffusens on the kino or the baby maybe cool/warm the kicker.


ram
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#3 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 07:03 AM

I am a student gaffer and have recently been asked to light an amateur bodybuilding competition.  There are some unusual constraints...a one camera setup directly in front of the stage (from the judges position), with 12 contestants in a line across the stage.  To make matters more interesting the ceiling is only 10 feet high, so space for lighting trees, scaffolds etc is limited.  The competition organisers are disappointed with previous-years results as the images have been too flat (the previous gaffer used PAR64's with red gel, which looked very rock 'n' roll but left the competitors looking rather flat and dark).  For normal bodybuilding shots I would normally use a strong top light or back light to increase muscle definition, or if taking a shot of individual contestants would also use side light.  My question is, with 12 contestants, is there an "economical" way of lighting all 12 to improve muscle definition without having lamps hanging 3 feet about their heads, or pointing into the eyes of the audience/camera?  As it is an amateur comp the budget is also very limited, and the organisers want the lighting to be as inconspicuous as possible!

Thanks

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


M8, try to use two 1K or 2K fresnels on stands ,
for backlighting them (cross lighting).Remember the light u will use for stage left will light the stage right and opposite.
and use whatever suits your needs for the front light, Kinoflo's are a nice idea but u will need two 8 banks,
Is it enough depth on the stage?
Try to move them toward the stage middle and toward the audience a bit more.
Dimitrios Koukas
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#4 Lars.Erik

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 02:58 PM

If you can. Try and shoot 16:9. This will help a lot. Imagine 12 contestants standing besides each other, and shooting in 4:3. A very BIG framing...

As for inexpesive lighting...always difficult. One way is to use tons of chinese lamps from IKEA. Hang them in the ceiling using auto poles. Use fluorescent tubes...this one might not be that good though.

Otherwise as stated, Kino or maybe even space lights. But these will set you back some buckaroos though...

Edited by Lars.Erik, 29 September 2005 - 03:00 PM.

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#5 Bill Totolo

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 11:24 AM

Maybe it's just me but I would imagine Kino Flo's and Chinese lanterns will fall off way too quickly to give you anything near what you need.

I would think in terms of par cans for your over all lighting and some source fours for spot and sculpting. To create definition you need sharp shadows and the soft lighting sources just don't give you that.

I might try lighting at 45 degree angles using one side as key, the other as fill.
Get in there during your pre-light and judge what ratio works for you.

For back light you can try lighting up from the floor or you can light the background instead of the subjects if you're worried about shooting light into your lens/audience.
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#6 Ram Shani

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Posted 01 October 2005 - 01:53 AM

hi

i think that 2-4 bank (long) with the egg-crate off will do the work but also china balls is good as long as you block anwanted lightspill.

bill ithink par cans can be a problem becouse the hight of the ceilling is 10 feet high

and the cans will be to close and ther will be big differnce in exposure top to bottom.

ram

Edited by ramdop, 01 October 2005 - 01:55 AM.

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#7 Bill Totolo

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Posted 03 October 2005 - 11:46 AM

I'm assuming this is in some kind of ballroom (with a low ceiling) but who knows?
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Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

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The Slider

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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post