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#1 Robert Edge

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 03:31 PM

The October issue of American Cinematographer contains two references to the use of video goggles as an alternative to a monitor. The magazine says that Cesar Charlone used video goggles on The Constant Gardener. I gather that he also used them for City of God. In an article on the film Dear Wendy, the magazine says that the cinematographer for that film tried goggles, but found them of questionable utility. Apparently Steve Gainer also used video goggles on a film called Black Cloud (see http://www.stevegain...press/ac1.html), and there are suggestions on the net that at least one National Geographic cameraman has used them.

Does anyone have experience with video goggles? Comments?
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#2 Dominik Muench

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 07:28 PM

not in cinematography but i used some cheap ones years and years ago for gaming, and even back then it was awesome, surely now the technology must have involved quite considerably. i read an interview with a steadycam operator a few months back whos using such goggles all the time and he was really satisfied with them.
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#3 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 09:12 PM

not in cinematography but i used some cheap ones years and years ago for gaming, and even back then it was awesome, surely now the technology must have involved quite considerably. i read an interview with a steadycam operator a few months back whos using such goggles all the time and he was really satisfied with them.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Really?
That's interesting, and how he sees what is happening outside of his frame?
Dimitrios Koukas
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#4 Nathan Milford

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 10:14 PM

Really?
That's interesting, and how he sees what is happening outside of his frame?
Dimitrios Koukas

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



Typically the goggles aren't opaque. They can be more like a heads-up-display in an jet fighter.

We have a set at Abel. I've seen a few DP's use them... but usually by the end of the day they're looking at the monitor like everyone else. The novelty wears off. Mostly they seem to get used in special situations and not so much for general use.

- nathan
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#5 Dominik Muench

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Posted 29 September 2005 - 11:05 PM

Really?
That's interesting, and how he sees what is happening outside of his frame?
Dimitrios Koukas

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>



yeah, depends on the googles, you can get some that are fully closed, where you only see whats on the tiny screens in front of your eyes, but there are also some that have seethrough plastic on the side or that are not fully closed and you can peek through the side.
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#6 Robert Edge

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 01:16 AM

I've seen a few DP's use them... but usually by the end of the day they're looking at the monitor like everyone else.  The novelty wears off.- nathan

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Nathan,

I asked my question because Cesar Charlone, who as far as I can figure out knows one or two things about cinematography, has used these goggles in at least two films, including one for which he was nominated for an Academy Award. Apparently, he does not consider them to be a "novelty" that "wears off". So given that he uses these goggles with the cameras that your company represents, does this mean that he knows something that you don't, that he is eccentric or that he is a bit thick?

As an owner of an Aaton camera, I would have thought that you and your company would be interested in talking about how this technology works with your product, about what the upsides and downsides are and where this technology is going, rather than dismissing it out of hand as a novelty.

P.S. I assume you have actually read the American Cinematographer article and know that Charlone owns and uses an A-Minima (a camera that, as you know, I own myself), and replaced two Arris SRIIIs with two Aaton XTR Prods on The Constant Gardener, because he found the latter more suitable for what he wanted to do.
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#7 Tim J Durham

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 06:24 AM

Nathan,

I asked my question because Cesar Charlone, who as far as I can figure out knows one or two things about cinematography, has used these goggles in at least two films, including one for which he was nominated for an Academy Award.  Apparently, he does not consider them to be a "novelty" that "wears off".  So given that he uses these goggles with the cameras that your company represents, does this mean that he knows something that you don't, that he is eccentric or that he is a bit thick?

As an owner of an Aaton camera, I would have thought that you and your company would be interested in talking about how this technology works with your product, about what the upsides and downsides are and where this technology is going, rather than dismissing it out of hand as a novelty.

P.S.  I assume you have actually read the American Cinematographer article and know that Charlone owns and uses an A-Minima (a camera that, as you know, I own myself), and replaced two Arris SRIIIs with two Aaton XTR Prods on The Constant Gardener, because he found the latter more suitable for what he wanted to do.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

So you wanted a sales pitch instead of his opinion based on his own anecdotal evidence?
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#8 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 10:34 AM

Hi,

Because the displays are so small - on the order of a typical LCD camera viewfinder - the resolution is pretty low.

Possibly OK for a video tap preview.

Phil
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