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#1 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 09:34 AM

Anyone know an easy way of threading daylight spools? Maybe my fingers are just too big! Especially a problem in a change bag. Any tricks?
Richard
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#2 John Pytlak RIP

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 10:13 AM

Anyone know an easy way of threading daylight spools?  Maybe my fingers are just too big!  Especially a problem in a change bag.  Any tricks?
Richard

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>


Have a pair of blunt-tipped scissors in the changing bag so you can trim the film end to a slightly rounded tip. Don't use tape to fasten the end of the film to the spool hub, as it might be accidently left on by the lab when they are processing the film.

Although loading spools in a darkroom or changing bag is highly recommended, many are able to tolerate the small amount of edgefog/endfog that may occur when loading quickly under subdued light --- your "mileage may vary".
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#3 Laurent Andrieux

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 11:05 AM

According to the stock sensitivity, the cans show "load un subdued light" or "load in total darkness".

You need a very low amount of light to load them, and I find it much easier to load daylight spool in very low light, than in a changing bag.

It's not only the spool, but such cameras as Bolex, K3, arri 16 st for instance that are not easy to load with no light at all...

Also if you keep the roll tight (don't pull on the film, but just don't let it roll out) and pass the first three feet, you shouldn't have any fogging problem.
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#4 Chris Keth

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 08:18 PM

I always just put a sharp kink in the film so it bends toward the center of the spool. Then you can just scrape the end along the center of the spool until it slips in and hooks the slit that's there.
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#5 Mike Lary

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Posted 30 September 2005 - 11:20 PM

Anyone know an easy way of threading daylight spools? Maybe my fingers are just too big! Especially a problem in a change bag. Any tricks?
Richard

I put the film end under my pointer finger, slightly behind the tip of my finger, then run my finger forward along the inside (core) of the spool, keeping the film flush with it. That way I can locate the opening with the tip of my finger and gently guide the film through. If the film is a slow speed, like 100 or 200, I'll let enough light in so I can see the inside of the take-up spool, and push the film end through at something closer to a 90 degree angle. Either way, it only takes five seconds or so to get it right.
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#6 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 01 October 2005 - 01:53 AM

Thank you all.

Yes, real problem is that my fingers are too large, and that I need to thread in total darkness sometimes because I spool down from long lengths.

In any case... I shall 1. Curve the end, 2.fold over about an inch, and 3. Use my index finger as a guide (I can insert my finger sideways into the spool) 4. get my small handed assistant to do it!

Regards,
Richard
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#7 Matt Pacini

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Posted 03 October 2005 - 06:10 PM

I had the same problem (I also spool down from 400 footers), but figured out a way to do it:

I use my little finger to find the slot that the film goes into. (I can't fit any other finger in there).
I then put my fingernail in the slot, then pull it out and park it right next to the slot.
I feed the film in, using my fingernail as a guide, and it slides right into the slot!
I can do this really quickly now. I hardly ever miss.

MP
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