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First time shooting concert footage with V2 500


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#1 Jason Banker

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 04:26 AM

Hi,

I will be shooting about 30 minutes of V2 500 at a large venue and need some advice about exposure. This is the first time I am shooting concert footage and have a few questions.

Did I chose the proper speed film? (I was afraid of underexposure, now I am thinking I might have to avoid overexposing)

I have a sekonic light meter and usually meter the light with the white dome from the actors postion. Since I will not be able to stand where the musicians are how do I check for proper exposure?

Do I just retract the dome and spin the head toward the stage and use that reading? There is also another head attachment that I have never used that I believe is used for spot metering things like landscapes. Should I try and use that?

Also with the amount of variation from the different light sources and the constantly changing light levels, do I take different readings as setups change or do I just set one stop and stick to it?

If I change locations ie. move directly next to the stage, would my f-stop change from my balconey shots? Should I then take another reading?

Basically this is something completely new for me and I need advice. All of my previous film work has been under controlled situations and this just seems like chaos. I just want to ensure I properly meter for the talent.

Any insight would be great,
Thanks
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#2 Tim J Durham

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 10:44 AM

B)-->
QUOTE(Jason B @ Oct 2 2005, 05:26 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Hi,

I will be shooting about 30 minutes of V2 500 at a large venue and need some advice about exposure. This is the first time I am shooting concert footage and have a few questions.

Did I chose the proper speed film? (I was afraid of underexposure, now I am thinking I might have to avoid overexposing)

I have a sekonic light meter and usually meter the light with the white dome from the actors postion. Since I will not be able to stand where the musicians are how do I check for proper exposure?

Do I just retract the dome and spin the head toward the stage and use that reading? There is also another head attachment that I have never used that I believe is used for spot metering things like landscapes. Should I try and use that?

Also with the amount of variation from the different light sources and the constantly changing light levels, do I take different readings as setups change or do I just set one stop and stick to it?

If I change locations ie. move directly next to the stage, would my f-stop change from my balconey shots? Should I then take another reading?

Basically this is something completely new for me and I need advice. All of my previous film work has been under controlled situations and this just seems like chaos. I just want to ensure I properly meter for the talent.

Any insight would be great,
Thanks
[/quote]
Take a digital still camera and a long telephoto lens with you (one that reads out shutter-speed and f-stops in the menulike a Canon 20D) and set it to the same ASA reading as your film stock, then put it in shutter priority mode set to the shutter speed of your film cam. Snap a picture and see what f-stop the camera used.
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#3 Jason Banker

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 01:37 PM

Would a 500 asa for digital photography equal 500 for film?

The reason I ask is when I put my sony F828 on 500 the pictures come out looking pretty grainy and are basically unusable. Digital asa seems somewhat of a joke compared to film, but your idea makes total sense otherwise. I think that will be my approach.

Thanks
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#4 Nate Downes

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 02:58 PM

B)-->
QUOTE(Jason B @ Oct 2 2005, 10:37 AM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Would a 500 asa for digital photography equal 500 for film?

The reason I ask is when I put my sony F828 on 500 the pictures come out looking pretty grainy and are basically unusable. Digital asa seems somewhat of a joke compared to film, but your idea makes total sense otherwise. I think that will be my approach.

Thanks
[/quote]

Equal for light gathering capability, not for image clarity. You have to think, the sensor on the F828 has pixels that are 14x larger than the grain in an average roll of 500 speed V2, and add on top of it that the 828's sensor is a fraction of the size of your movie film, suddenly the film seems a lot clearer.

But, the 828 would be handy to get quick references for f-stop needs.
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#5 Tim J Durham

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 04:14 PM

B)-->
QUOTE(Jason B @ Oct 2 2005, 02:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Would a 500 asa for digital photography equal 500 for film?

The reason I ask is when I put my sony F828 on 500 the pictures come out looking pretty grainy and are basically unusable. Digital asa seems somewhat of a joke compared to film, but your idea makes total sense otherwise. I think that will be my approach.

Thanks
[/quote]
Yes,
you're only using the digital still cam for exposure readings. I mean that you shouldn't judge what your film image will look like because the digital stills are grainy. Do a search of this site for the film stock you are using. I know quite a few have mentioned that they rate 500 ASA film at 320 ASA. This might be a good idea in such a high-contrast situation so you can pull some detail out of the shadows. Assuming this is an indoor concert (or outdoors at night) with your typical concert lighting.
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#6 Jason Banker

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Posted 02 October 2005 - 05:29 PM

B)--><div class='quotetop'>QUOTE(Jason B @ Oct 2 2005, 02:37 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}></div><div class='quotemain'><!--quotec-->
I know quite a few have mentioned that they rate 500 ASA film at 320 ASA. This might be a good idea in such a high-contrast situation so you can pull some detail out of the shadows. Assuming this is an indoor concert (or outdoors at night) with your typical concert lighting.


I just got back from the sound check and wasn't able to get meter readings from the stage. My sony F828 set at 400asa and shutter at 1/25 had readings of between 2 and 2.8 from the balconey and main floor area. Does that seem right?

The lighting seems extremely backlite and there was some smoke in the air that seemed to destroy any chance of getting detail in the shadows. Maybe the actual show will have some extra spotlight action but I can't be sure. This doesn't sit with me too well right now.

As for some good news, it turns out that I will be able to shoot from the pit. So that should help, but i am still wondering about over exposure. Or should I just set it at F 2.0 and let it ride.

Also what filter cuts thru stage smoke? I have a polarizing filter will that do anything?

Any other suggestions? This is crunch time...
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#7 Tim J Durham

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Posted 03 October 2005 - 07:59 AM

B)-->
QUOTE(Jason B @ Oct 2 2005, 06:29 PM) <{POST_SNAPBACK}>

I just got back from the sound check and wasn't able to get meter readings from the stage. My sony F828 set at 400asa and shutter at 1/25 had readings of between 2 and 2.8 from the balconey and main floor area. Does that seem right?

The lighting seems extremely backlite and there was some smoke in the air that seemed to destroy any chance of getting detail in the shadows. Maybe the actual show will have some extra spotlight action but I can't be sure. This doesn't sit with me too well right now.

As for some good news, it turns out that I will be able to shoot from the pit. So that should help, but i am still wondering about over exposure. Or should I just set it at F 2.0 and let it ride.

Also what filter cuts thru stage smoke? I have a polarizing filter will that do anything?

Any other suggestions? This is crunch time...
[/quote]
Sounds about right. Film can handle a little overexposure better than video so it sounds like you're good to go. Don't use a polarizer.
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The Slider

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Glidecam

CineLab

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc