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U2's "Rattle and Hum"


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#1 Bill Totolo

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Posted 03 October 2005 - 12:22 PM

Can anyone point to an article on the technical spec's of this production?
I'm interested in the lenses used, film stocks, processing etc.

Thanks,
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#2 Dalton Swift

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Posted 23 February 2008 - 01:09 PM

Can anyone point to an article on the technical spec's of this production?
I'm interested in the lenses used, film stocks, processing etc.

Thanks,


bump...
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#3 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 23 February 2008 - 02:46 PM

The article below states all the stocks used, I assumed it was 5222 & 7222 because of how grainy the film is. Which is how I found the article by searching "Rattle and Hum" with "Double X". Looks like they probably all had zooms on'em, but it doesn't say what kind.

Taken from: http://www.interfere...es/id78259.html

"The color footage was filmed on December 19th and 20th 1987 during shows that cost the general public $5.00 for admission. It was filmed on 35mm Kodak 5294 high speed color negative film rated at 400ASA, using four Panaflex Gold cameras, three Arri BL IV's, one Arri BL III, one Panaglide, one Steadicam, and one Panaglide mounted in a helicopter.

The black and white footage was filmed on the 7th and 8th of November 1987, using 35 mm Kodak 5222 Double X high speed black and white negative film. There were eight cameras, all of which were Arri BL IV's except for a Steadicam that was an Arri III. There was documentary footage shot on four cameras, all of which were Arri 16 SR's. Otto Nemenz International custom built the zoom controls into the 16mm camera handles to make it easier to shoot the band. The film stock was 16mm Kodak 7231 Plus X medium speed black and white negative film and 16mm Kodak 7222 Double X high-speed negative film.

The total amount of film used for the concert shoots was 210,000 feet of 35mm color film, and 125,000 feet of 35mm black and white film. The documentary portion used 250,000 feet of 16mm film, which after being transferred to 35mm film turned out to be 625,000 feet. The grand total came out to be 960,000 feet of film, and if run continuously the movie would last for 1 week, 9 hours, 46 minutes, and 40 seconds - enough to make 118 90-minute movies, and enough to make a whole lot of U2 fans very happy. Duart Laboratory in New York processed the black and white film, Deluxe in Hollywood processed the color and Technicolor in Universal City made the prints.

The concert film editing was done using time coding and six VTR's computer-synchronised in real-time so that up to six camera angles could be viewed at one time. It took 10 months to sync the film with the sound. Joe O'Herlihy coordinated the entire live sound recording and the concert soundtracks were recorded on the Manor Mobile, the Pumacest Advision Mobile, and Remote Recording Services mobile recording studios using overlapping 24 track machines with 48 track capability. All the people responsible for these tasks are located in a list at the end of this text as there were too many to list here."

Edited by Jonathan Bowerbank, 23 February 2008 - 02:47 PM.

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#4 Bill Totolo

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Posted 23 February 2008 - 04:35 PM

Great find, Jonathan. Thanks for posting.
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#5 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 23 February 2008 - 05:18 PM

Great find, Jonathan. Thanks for posting.


yw

It only took a little over 2 years ;)
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#6 Dalton Swift

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Posted 24 February 2008 - 01:40 AM

thanks!
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