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Getting rich blacks in video...?


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#1 Derek Leverette

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 01:09 AM

A very basic question because I'm still learning: how do I get rich blacks in miniDV? I've only begun to experiment with video, and for now I have no access to 24p or HD. I would like to shoot low-light scenes where much of the frame falls to black, or at least near to black. What I'm getting is visual "noise" in the black areas, no doubt a symptom of what the camera sees as underexposure. Is it possible to get true blackness on a prosumer, miniDV-only camera?
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#2 Dimitrios Koukas

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 01:46 AM

A very basic question because I'm still learning: how do I get rich blacks in miniDV? I've only begun to experiment with video, and for now I have no access to 24p or HD. I would like to shoot low-light scenes where much of the frame falls to black, or at least near to black. What I'm getting is visual "noise" in the black areas, no doubt a symptom of what the camera sees as underexposure. Is it possible to get true blackness on a prosumer, miniDV-only camera?


Hello,
First of all disable the auto gain feature of your camera.
It must be somewhere on the menu, if you don't have this option, then u just can't.
You see consumer cameras come with this auto tools just because there aren't for proffesional jobs.
Dimitrios Koukas
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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 03:50 AM

Hi,

If you mean "rich blacks" to mean the sort of results you get on film, what you're actually after is somewhat crushed blacks. A few prosumer level cameras have adjustable black level, but usually for fine control you've got to be using something at least on the level of a DSR-500 or so.

However, you can achieve near-identical results in post, and you probably should - use the dynamic range you have to its best extent by underexposing, then pump it back up in post and getting everything back where you want it.

Phil
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#4 George Lekovic

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Posted 08 October 2005 - 03:03 PM

Hello,
First of all disable the auto gain feature of your camera.
It must be somewhere on the menu, if you don't have this option, then u just can't.
You see consumer cameras come with this auto tools just because there aren't for proffesional jobs.
Dimitrios Koukas


even DVX100 has settigns for black piedestal - once you raise it it will preserve black areas from fogging and will leave them black.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

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