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Super 16 Archiving for HD


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#1 Steve Denny

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 04:31 PM

I typically transfer my Super 16 footage in full frame. I do not tranfer to a 4:3 ratio.

With the intent to use library and stock footage down the road for HD release, should I change my transfer format?

Someone suggested tranferring it anamorphically...is that possible in transfer?
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 11:59 PM

I typically transfer my Super 16 footage in full frame. I do not tranfer to a 4:3 ratio.

With the intent to use library and stock footage down the road for HD release, should I change my transfer format?

Someone suggested tranferring it anamorphically...is that possible in transfer?


What do you mean by "full-frame"? Are you transferring Super-16 to Standard Def (NTSC or PAL) 4x3 w/ a letterbox?

"Anamorphic" in video means 16x9 Standard Definition, which is 1.78 : 1.

If you intend to use the stock footage later for HD release, you'd need to retransfer it to HD.
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#3 Steve Denny

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 10:50 AM

By "full frame" I simply mean using the enitire Super 16 image as the camera is set up for S-16. We used to transfer the S-16 footage to 4:3, thus losing some of the image at the the edges.

We transfer to Digi Beta and Beta SP format (NTSC).

It seems that it does not matter how we transfer (16:9 or 4:3) in regard to HD as I'm assuming we must
re-transfer in Hi-Def on HD stock?

As for anamorphic, one client that tranfers their footage for us always sends it to us and the image is compressed or squeezed to create a vertical impression. We must always realign it in post. They call this anamorphic but I don't believe that is the coreect term for this transfer. What is that and why do they transfer it that way? What is the advantage of that?

Thanks for your response, David.

Steve

Edited by Steve Denny, 06 October 2005 - 10:54 AM.

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#4 David Cox

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 05:16 PM

Hi Steve,

The anamorphic video standard was created so that wide screen images (i.e. TV widescreen at 1.78:1) could be recorded and transmitted without changing the existing video infrastructure. Essentially, an anamorphic recording is technically exactly the same as a 4:3 recording. It uses the same number of pixels. The difference is that the width of the picture is considered to be "squashed" by a third. At the camera / telecine end, the image is either optically or digitally squashed into a 4:3 shape. Then on playback a widesceen monitor stretches the image back out. If at any point you view the recording on a "normal" 4:3 monitor, the image will look squeezed.

The advantage for you recording to an anamorphic shape over a letterboxed 4:3 recording is that anamorphic recordings use the full vertical height of the frame and thus all available vertical resolution. If you were to record "wide screen" images to 4:3 using black bars top and bottom, you only end up using 75% of the vertical resolution for your picture.

HD formats on the other hand aren't anamorphic. They are naturally 16:9 (1.78:1) because they have enough horizontal pixels with regard to the number of vertical rows to hold a widescreen image without the need for any fiddling.

If you were looking to archive to HD tape, then you would most likely want to look towards the best quality for future proofing. Today, the HdCam SR and HD D5 HD tape formats would offer you the best balance of practicality, quality and widespread use.

Hope all that helps!

David Cox
Baraka Post Production
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